Beyond Steel

38 Items.

1-10  11-20  21-30  31-38  

  1. The immigrant woman and her job
    This report examines the role of immigrant women in industry in the United States. Various aspects of their lives are studied, such as personal history (country of origin), family, housing, education, economic responsiblities, reasons for employment, etc. The immigrant woman's effect on industry as well as her needs of employment are detailed in this report. --Series note: United States. Dept. of Labor. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau ; no. 74.
    ix, 179, ii p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. 1930
  2. Marchers in Sixth Ward Roll of Honor parade
    Marchers in Sixth Ward Roll of Honor parade celebrating neighborhood residents fighting in World War II, Allentown, Pa. in 1944. This is a digital image of the original photograph ; the image can also be found in the book by Dr. George J. Koury titled, Ajdaduna : from Syria to America : presented by Americans of Arabic Heritage Society of the Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania, October 28, 1995.
    1 photograph : b&w ; 10 x 16 cm. 1944
  3. The people of Bethlehem : community renewal program 2
    This report, prepared by the Bureau of Planning and Development of the City of Bethlehem (and the Community Renewal Program) describes the characteristics of Bethlehem - including information about its history, its inhabitants, and future trends. A study of the city's population, distribution, and characteristics of the people are outlined in order to help understand the future characteristics of the city of Bethlehem. Various charts and graphs are included that details these statistics.
    66 p. : ill., charts, maps ; 22 x 28 cm. 1967
  4. Herman P. Landrock
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Herman P. Landrock (July 5, 1889 - May 29, 1980) was married to Anna Landrock, née Trembeth. He came to New York from Germany in 1906 at the age of 17 and was hired by Bethlehem Steel. Landrock previously served an apprenticeship at the Krupp Works in Essen. By age 20 he was promoted to foreman at Bethlehem Steel and subsequently held positions of increasing responsibility including chief tool engineer in the Ordinance Division and head plating engineer in the Plating Division. In this interview Landrock discusses his early experiences in New York and Bethlehem as a young man who spoke no English. He discusses how he found lodging, established himself, and found his way into his first position in the Bethlehem plant. He also discusses details of his work, his further education, transferring to Rochester to work with the Symington-Anderson Company, working with women during World War II, remembrances of Eugene Grace, and comparisons between Krupp and Bethlehem Steel. Furthermore, Landrock delves into subjects such as his family, Freemasonry, his experiences as a member of the Bethlehem Steel Club, and the merger of the boroughs of Bethlehem, West Bethlehem, and South Bethlehem to form the city of Bethlehem. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1974
  5. Carl F. Ottenberg
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Carl F. Ottenberg (ca. 1894-February 1, 1986), born in Berlin, Germany, was the son of the Franz and Ida Ottenberg. He was married to Helen Ottenberg, née Hartman. Ottenberg worked at Bethlehem Steel from 1916 to 1961 and was promoted to foreman during his tenure. In this interview he discusses his apprenticeship as a machinist in Germany, working for the Hamburg-American Line, leaving a German ship in Hoboken in 1914, being classified as an enemy alien during World War I, prior employment with Gerber Engineering Co., shifts, strikes, worker attitudes, his neighborhood, social activities, and traveling back to Germany to see his family. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  6. Ceferino L. Orta
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Ceferino L. 'Sticks' Orta (August 26,1901-December 6, 1997), born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, was the son of Pascual and Dolores Orta, née Lozada. He was married Maria Orta, who died in 1994. Orta emigrated from Mexico City and started as a laborer in 1926 with Bethlehem Steel and later became a pickler in Cold-rolled Steel, retiring in 1966. He was president of the Mexican Aztec Society of Bethlehem, a social organization that also provided mutual benefits to its members. In this interview he discusses his reasons for coming to Bethlehem, working conditions, Bethlehem Steel's labor camp for Mexican workers, working during the Depression, and his views on changing attitudes about work. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  7. Earl J. Bauman
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Earl J. Bauman (1910-January 12, 2000), born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was the son of George and Matilda Bauman née Shearer. He was married to Grace E. Bauman, née Shoenberger. Bauman taught history, government, and economics in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania high schools for 30 years and also worked for several years at Bethlehem Steel during World War II serving as a clerk and as a security officer. He also served on the Fountain Hill Borough Council. In this interview he provides descriptions of the Fountain Hill neighborhood and leisure activities as a youth, as well as detailed commentary on his career in education covering salaries and work environment, teaching methods, teaching the children of immigrants, discipline, impact of epidemics, and coaching. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  8. Gustave Stefanik
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Gustave Stefanik (b. April 29, 1899), born in the Slovakian region of Austria-Hungary, was the son of Thomas and Mary Subort (sp?). He was married twice. After working as a teenager in local silk mills he obtained a job at Bethlehem Steel and was trained as a machinist. He later served the company as a foreman and a safety supervisor. In this interview he discusses his family background, immigration, education, participation in the company union (Employee Representation Plan), serving as a shop steward for Forge Specialty Machine Shop Number 3, safety work, being locked in the plant during a strike, wages and piecework. Stefanik was also very active in the Slovak community and discusses local politics, Catholic churches, National Sokols, Catholic Sokol, Slovak League, Tammany Club, National Sokol Democratic Club, National Slovak Society, and Slovakian-language newspapers. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  9. John Batista
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    John Batista emigrated from Portugal at the age of 19. Joining Bethlehem Steel in 1933 as a chipper, Batista was one of many Portuguese immigrants employed by the company. In this interview, Batista, who also worked as a loader and stacker, discusses steel-making processes and safety procedures. He also talks about surviving the Great Depression and conditions in the plant during World War II, including working with women during the war. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  10. John Buttillo
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    John Buttillo (ca. 1905-December 1, 1994) was born in Port Henry, New York and was the son of Vincenzo and Louise Buttillo, née Campano. He was first married to Irma Buttillo, née DiMeglio and after her death to Catherine Buttillo née Garefino. Buttillo started working at Bethlehem Steel as a chipper at age 15 and spent most of his time at Bethlehem Steel in the Forge Specialty department. In this interview he discusses his move to Italy as a child and subsequent return to the United States five years later, details of the various jobs he performed as a steelworker, participation in strikes, views on the union, and his and his father's involvement in bootlegging in Bethlehem during Prohibition. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
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