Beyond Steel

38 Items.

1-10  11-20  21-30  31-38  

  1. Jose S. Esteves
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Jose S. Esteves emigrated from Portugal in 1922. He estimates that he first joined Bethlehem Steel in 1923 and then left and worked in other jobs such as coal mining and construction. In Bethlehem he helped build the Hill-to-Hill Bridge. In 1936 he returned to Bethlehem Steel where he worked until he retired in 1968. In this interview Esteves lays out his reasons for coming to the United States, describes the jobs he's held, talks about how he educated himself, and describes how he returned to Portugal to visit after World War II and was stranded for several months before he was able to return. Esteves also describes conflicts with foremen at Bethlehem Steel. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  2. Louis Ropos
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Louis Ropos was born in Austria-Hungary and emigrated from there in 1911. After starting with Bethlehem Steel working in a zinc mill in 1911, he left the company and worked in St. Louis, Indianapolis, and New York. In 1920 he returned to Bethlehem Steel and worked there until he retired in 1962. In this interview he discusses emigrating, boarding in Bethlehem upon arrival, the various shops he worked in, steel-making processes, his views on the union, some detail of jobs held outside of Bethlehem Steel, and the timekeeping process at the plant. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  3. Reuben E. Lopez, Sr.
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Reuben E. Lopez Sr. (February 22, 1910?-July 6, 1996: a 1903 date appears in his obituary but conflicts with other data in the obituary and the interview), born in Chanute, Kansas, was a son of the Amado and Mariana Lopez, née Pereida. He was married to Rachel Lopez, née Rodriguez. Lopez started with Bethlehem Steel in 1926 and rose to the level of General Foreman before his retirement in 1970. Lopez's father, a native of Mexico, was recruited by Bethlehem Steel in San Antonio, Texas in 1923 and the family was brought to Bethlehem and housed in a labor camp. In this interview Lopez discusses his father's work, his relationships with workers as a foreman, steel-making processes, working with women during World War II, his family, and his views on the company. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  4. Simon Pavel
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Simon Pavel emigrated from Austria-Hungary in 1912, initially living in St. Louis and Detroit before coming to Bethlehem. He describes himself as Romanian. He was possibly married to Mary Pavel, née Muntian. After working at the coke works starting in 1913 he came to Bethlehem Steel in 1916. In this interview Pavel describes his life in Austria-Hungary, the process of emigrating, working in St. Louis and Detroit, making artillery at Bethlehem Steel during World War I, wages, retirement, and his family. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  5. Stephen C. Farris
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Lt. Col. Stephen C. Farris (1912-April 13, 1982) was married to Anna S. Farris, née Posivak. His parents emigrated from what is now Slovakia. His early employment included operating a lathe at Bethlehem Steel and working as a spinner at the R.K. Laris silk mill. After graduating from the United States Military Academy he served in the Philippines and Japan during World War II. After the war he served in a variety of positions including anti-aircraft battalion commander and assistant military attaché. In this interview Farris discusses his family, childhood activities, education, the influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, sports sponsored by religious and fraternal organizations, and Slovak traditions and customs. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  6. William Cummings
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    William Cummings (b. ca. 1908) was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The son of a geologist at Bethlehem Steel, Cummings graduated from Dartmouth College and later earned a degree in mining engineering from Lehigh University. He worked in a variety of different positions including helper on a coal mine drilling rig, scouting gold mines in Canada, and office work in the mining department at Bethlehem Steel. In this interview Cummings speaks in detail about Bethlehem's neighborhoods and people, leisure activities as a child and as a young man, and attending college during the Great Depression. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  7. Women of Bethlehem Steel - Lewis J. Kozo & Mary Kozo
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Lewis J. Kozo (1908-October 24, 1992 ) was married to Mary Kozo, née Hock, and was the son of Joseph and Mary Kozo, née Antol. Mary Kozo (ca. 1915- April 27, 2003), married to Lewis, was the daughter of Joseph J. and Anna Velas, née Mack. Both Lewis and Mary participated in this interview. Their parents emigrated from Hungary. After working in a silk mill as a weaver Lewis joined Bethlehem Steel at age 19. Mary joined the R.K. Laris silk mill at a young age and later worked as a seamstress at Phoenix Clothes (?). In this interview Lewis discusses organizing, strikes, favoritism, discrimination, and safety. Mary discusses her efforts to organize workers at Laris and they both discuss life in the Hungarian community including social clubs, sports, acting, language school, newspapers, and food. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  8. Women of Bethlehem Steel - Mary Morykon
    In the Age of Steel: Oral Histories from Bethlehem Pennsylvania

    Mary Morykon was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and her father emigrated from Ukraine. During World War II she worked as a machine operator at Bethlehem Steel. Prior to this she worked at the R.K. Laris silk mill and subsequent to her position at Bethlehem Steel she worked as a floor lady at a bathing suit factory for 25 years. In this interview she discusses her work at Bethlehem Steel including work environment, hiring process, safety, work processes, work relationships with foremen and matrons, reasons for working, the ethnic mix of workers in the plant, her parent's attitude towards her work, and attending night school to learn how to operate metal-working machinery. She also discusses her regrets of not furthering her education, early discrimination, her father's work at Bethlehem Steel, details of her work as a floor lady, working as a waitress, and her views on feminism. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University students and faculty from 1974 through 1977 focusing on retired Bethlehem Steel workers, business people, and the heirs of industrial magnates. The project was co-sponsored by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, who provided contact information for retired steel workers. An oral history interview is an act of memory and hence both highly selective and highly subjective. While it accurately reflects what a narrator remembers (or chooses to tell) of his or her experience and viewpoints, it may not accurately represent what actually transpired or what another person may have experienced. As such users should subject interviews to the same degree of critical scrutiny they would any other historical source.
    mp3 file ; transcript; index 1975
  9. Interview with Cathy Cooper : former teacher and worker with Bethlehem Stee...
    This is an interview with Cathy Cooper, conducted by Susan Clemens. In this interview, Cooper talks in detail about her family background, especially her grandparents' and parents' lives. She discusses what her grandparents and parents' lives were like once in America, including topics such as employment and education. She also provides details of what it was like growing up in Northampton, PA, i.e. activities growing up, shopping, etc. She also discusses her experience working at the Bethlehem Steel, as well as other jobs she had held. Lastly, Cooper goes on to discuss how she thinks the Lehigh Valley has changed throughout the years.
    1 computer file (1 hr., 26 min.) : digital + 1 transcript [2005?]
  10. Interview with Helen and John Remenar : living on the South Side of Bethleh...
    This is an interview with Helen and John Remenar, residents of Bethlehem, PA, conducted by Andrew Krause. In this interview, the Remenars discuss various topics concerning their lives in the Lehigh Valley. Some of theses topics include the following: living on the South Side of Bethlehem, the different ethnic groups who lived there, schooling, how they met, the Third Street farmers market, their childhood, transportation (buses, trolleys, trains), John's time in the military during World War II and his experience working at Bethlehem Steel Company as a welder, the Steel Strike of 1946, Saucon Park, and Helen's experiences working at a silk mill and a furniture factory. They also discuss what they think of the present situation with the redevelopment of the Bethlehem Steel land on the South Side.
    1 computer file (ca. 1 hr., 29 min.) : digital + 1 transcript 2006
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