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19.  Monday.  Weather still rough, and few ladies at breakfast. As
the day drew on, it cleared up, though a brisk breeze still blew. Talk
with Noble & the Steward, fumigation & reading.   Stopped at nigh
sunset at Port Huron, in the Saint Clair river, (Lake Huron being
passed.)     A lumber-place, pretty.  Sarnia on the opposite shore.    On,
another stoppage, then to Newport, where we lay to all night.   I, with
Noble & others visit the E.K. Collins, a fine Steamboat, about to be
launched on the lakes, by Ward.       Meet Montgomery in returning to
the vessel.  Learn that Frisell is at Detroit,   the National.   With other
matters about folk.
  20.  Tuesday.  Breakfast over we are at Detroit.   Ashore, I shake
hands with Noble, and off, leaving carpetbag & pipe-stem at the Wa-
verly, first to the Post Office, and then close adjacent, to the office
of J S Newberry, the good-looking Attorney.  Soon he came in, &
greeting me with hearty hand-gripping,  gan telling me all the news of
folks; showed me all his Excursion letters, in the Detroit Tribune.
To that Office with him, introduced to Pomeroy its proprietor, & Barnes
& Warren, editors.  An evening paper, whig, weekly, tri weekly, 
and daily.   Pomeroy, dark haired, keen faced, shrewd, gentlemanly man,
the originator of  Expresses.         Introduced to divers other folk, and
presently saw Campeau in the street.    He joined us, and as I, with
Pomeroy and a Mr Miller walked to the residence of the latter in
accordance with a dinner invitation, Campeau agreed to devote the
afternoon to my edification.    Newberry, refusing to dine with us, had
left us.       An excellent dinner, champagnes & wines accompanying.   The
three gentlemen present were all men of intellect, ability & position,
noble specimens of American character.       Miller, our host, a small, spec-
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page one hundred and twelve
Description:Describes a day spent in Detroit.
Date:1853-09-19
Subject:Barnes; Campeau; Frisell; Great Lakes (North America); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Miller (Michigan); Montgomery; Newberry, J.S.; Noble, Frank; Pomeroy; Thunderstorms; Travel; Ward, Sam; Warren (Michigan)
Coverage (City/State):Detroit, [Michigan]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.