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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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{3  Thursday       All these days sick, and confined to my room.
  4  Friday.       A bilous attack, like to the one experienced on the
  5.  Saturday       journey.  Could take nothing but soups or tea, vo-
  6.  Sunday.}       mited sometimes, and one day had horrible cramps &
spasms.    Pill taking and purging.    A dreary, monotonous, painful
time, slightly feverish and delirious at night.     Oh those weary nights;
to lie perspiring horribly, blankets heaped on you, quite sleepless,
restlessly turning round and round, your mind dwelling on some wearisome
topic you couldn t change.      To run over all sorts of past, half-for
gotten events of your life, to fancy New York,   England, home, to
think you might die here, away from every face you know.   To hear
the dogs howl throughout the live-long night, and the dull bell be-
tokening the upproach of another wearisome day.   To fancy the vast
cotton-fields without, the woods, swamp and cane-brakes, and the
Mississippi rolling onwards to the sea.   To picture home hen the
news came     I wish not to recall it any longer.   It was a 
most wretched time, and I was very sick.        They were very kind, and
attentive to me.      /        Mr Alick Keene was sick also, about this time,
having the  Chills  very badly.    /        I got a letter from Waud, in reply
to one I wrote to him from Alabama.         Oliver Kellam came over to see
me once or twice, and wrote me a friendly letter.        When I was up,
one or two days I kept my bed, I read.      Divers books, among them
that strange one of Borrows hight Lavengro.   There s good stuff in that
man.
  7.  Monday.   Able to take a walk to the river and back.  Still
very queer.
  8.  Tuesday.   Kellam fetched me over to Wilton Hall in the
buggy.   Didn t stir out much.    His grandfather is out on horseback all
day, coming home only to his meals.   They keep house together.  Kellam
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page one hundred and eighty-eight
Description:Describes his illness while visiting Keene Richards in Transylvania, Louisiana.
Date:1853-11-03
Subject:Diseases; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Keane, Alick; Kellam, Oliver; Morgan, Judge; Travel; Waud, Alfred
Coverage (City/State):[Transylvania, Louisiana]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.