Lehigh University
The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
Previous Issue Next Issue
Previous Page Next Page
0 matches
old English books.   One I must get Herbert s Poetic works.        Walked
back in rain drizzle at 11, no cars overtaking me.        Reading
Curtis  Potiphar Papers  a downright clever  Vanity fair  book on
New York society.
  30.  Wednesday.  A note and boy from Weed.    Writing till 1 1/2,
then dined, and down town.    To Weed s for block, Strongs, Tailors,
Mc Afee s & other places.         Returned by 4, Ben Haun called &
left.      I to Savings Bank for $30.    Over half an hours waiting in
the long queue of folks, during which I finished the Potiphar papers.
Then to supper, and room.  /     Reading Aristophanes.  Plays
which half a century before Our Saviours birth shook the sides of Keen
witted, laughter loving Greeks.  Strange is it, after all that solemn tramp
of nigh two thousand years, with the rise and fall of empires, the
mighty names born, the deeds piteous, terrible, divine & heroic   to be
reading these plays!        A new, neat, cleanly-printed English volume.
What was England when Parthenon-building, Pericles ruled Greeks wit
nessed the performance of these?     Ultima Thule   savage Northern
land, dire forests engirdled by strange seas, peopled (to the imagination
of the Greeks) by a race of monsters with dog s heads surmounting a
human form.    /                      Very Pagan are these dramas.  Witty,
poetic, they are, but there s no finger pointing heaven-wards.    They
are wonderfully ingenious in epithet and phraseology.    And also very
Punchy,   they remind me of Punch!          There s the same buf-
foonery article, and shrewd common-sense within.  They discuss public
matters, political and social, ever with a sound verdict. /         In
the  Birds  there s a downright  Bombastes Furioso  scene;   where
the Dead Man bargains with Bacchus about carrying baggage into Hades.
     /     Waud & Damoreau called, singly.  Waud being going up-
town wards to drill; and looking in at 10 1/2 after wards.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page two hundred and ten
Description:Gives his thoughts on ancient Greek plays.
Date:1853-11-29
Subject:Books and reading; Damoreau, Charles (Brown); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haun, Ben; Punch.; Waud, Alfred; Weed
Coverage (City/State):New York, [New York]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.