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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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fessedly fine overtures are but harmonious discord to me.    I love
simple tunes.      /              Hillard and I went to Shelleys for
some oysters afterwards, and parted at 11 1/2.
  8. Thursday.     Indoors all day, drawing and matagrabolized.
Evening came Damoreau, and Hillard, just as I had sat down
to Carlyle.       The former leaving, I presently went out with Hillard,
ale at the Shades, and talk,  I walking up Broadway with him sub-
sequently, parting nigh midnight.
  9. Friday.  Down town, Goslings, Post Office, Wells & Webb,
and call at Bunnell s room in Ann Street.       He s now in the
news agency business for California, has little to do save two days
in a month, and just rubs on.  Talk of the fire  &c .  Carroll
came in.  Left, met Bonar, and Picton.    Picton s progressing
downwards with considerable proclivity, I think, looks disreputable
and sottish.    The man has abilities, and education, and a certain
alertness of brain, all to be muddied by Native Americanism and
alcohol.             Back to room and drawing.      Hillard came at 5,
and Weed, with Picayune cuts.       Send him to Office with  em.
Had set to reading, when Waud & Yatman came.   The
latter has queer excitable ways with him, shouts out a question as
to a book, or object in the room with as much precipitation and vocife-
ration, as though the house were on fire.   Withal he is inquisitive, danda-
ical, geologically-read, and good-humored.            /             They having
gave, read awhile, and commenced letter to Boutcher.  I marvel
where he ll read it.
  10. Saturday.  Drawing busily till 1, then dined at Erford s,
Neagle, and actor there.  Down town, at Picayune Office, Wells
and Webb &c.   Back with a pile of blocks and little clock, the
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page two hundred and fifteen
Description:Mentions writing a letter to his friend William Boutcher, who will be traveling in the Middle East.
Date:1853-12-07
Subject:Bonar; Boutcher, William; Bunnell; Carroll; Damoreau, Charles (Brown); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hillard, Frank; Music; Nagle, James P. (Watt); Picton, Thomas; Waud, Alfred; Weed; Yatman
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Coverage (Street):Ann Street; Broadway
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.