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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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							63
her recent sojourn at Staten Island, Levison brought
down, among the Picayune letters, one for  Bell Thorne 
care of J. C. Haney   which  by mistake  he (Levison)
opened.    Twas from some paramour of the chaste
Allie s   an impassioned, highly-colored salaciously scandal-
ous business, out-heroding the famous Consuelo letter
of the Forrest trial, and leaving little doubt of the
nature of the intimacy between them.           To the
Tribune Office where I saw Dana; to Leslie s with
information about certain Kansas photographer at the
former place.    Leslie asking me to step round to
the Editorial rooms in Frankfort street, I discover
Sol s hiding place.    He twas at work in a little room,
key inside   no response on knocking.     Going to the
Picayune Office I find Haney sick.              He bids me
caution Sol of his danger of being arrested for larceny
on the box question; and tells me his side of the
affair.              Allie had tried impropriety with him,
commencing by assuming penitence, acknowledging  she
had been very foolish  in the past, and declaring
she wished to be good &c.     A correspondence took
place between them, which Allie soon wished to make
warmer than Haney expected.            His old and just es-
timate of her character had become softened by her pro-
fessions, disconsolations, simulations, but (he says) he
didn t go in for an intrigue.             She said he mistook
her, and the like.       Meantime he, Sol and Will
Waud frequented her boarding house nocturnally,
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight: page seventy
Description:Regarding Jesse Haney's story of his acquaintance with Allie Vernon.
Date:1856-09-18
Subject:Dana, Charles A.; Eytinge, Solomon; Forrest, Edwin; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Leslie, Frank; Levison, William; Levison, William, Mrs.; Vernon, Allie (Margaret Eytinge); Waud, William; Women
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Coverage (Street):Frankfort Street
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight
Description:Includes descriptions of the process of publishing his book, ''The Physiology of New-York Boarding Houses;'' his poor mental state upon returning to New York from England; meeting Walt Whitman; visits with Fanny Fern, James Parton, and Harriet Jacobs' daughter Louisa who is living with them; a visit to the Catskill Mountains with the Edwards family; moving into the boarding house at 132 Bleecker Street; working on the publication ''European'' with Colonel Hugh Forbes; the death of publisher William Levison and his daughter Ellen in his boarding house; visiting the scene of the murder of a dentist to get a sketch of the suspect; visiting Newport, Rhode Island, on assignment to sketch for Frank Leslie; and the death of his brother-in-law, Joseph Greatbatch.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Medical care; Mental illness; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Newport, Rhode Island
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.