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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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							93
has written acceptation of terms proposed to him,
and is progressing with my cuts.           Met Ar-
nold the other day.     He s sub editorializing for
the Sunday Mercury.              Leslie has made a
smash    tis well I didn t go to Kansas.          No
remittances, and nearly a thousand miles from
New York, winter coming on, and a wild country
would not present a desirable look out.          I ve
written to Mr Greatbatch.    Also to Hannah  
(bless her!)     Went over to Parton s with Haney
on Thursday night.        A somewhat dull evening.
Fortune telling and cards.       Parton looks ill.
I find Haney detests Oliver Dyer   as I do   
and contemns the ass Perkins.    Neither were there.
Parton is very good natured   or weak   to tolerate
that Dyer in his house.           The fellow ought to
have been born a snake.              
  Mrs Gouverneur s back at our boarding house
with her spoiled child, little May.    Also Patten
and his wife.    He a hard-visaged, dogmatic,
ill-bred  politician   an ex-custom
house officer and place-seeker.       His wife, spare,
dark eyed, her hair in curls, good natured,
talkative, shrewd, energetic down easter.    I like
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight: page one hundred
Description:Mentions that Mrs. Gouverneur and the Pattens have returned to his boarding house.
Date:1856-10-31
Subject:Andrew; Arnold, George; Bennett, Hannah; Boardinghouses; Dyer, Oliver; Gouverneur, May; Gouverneur, Mrs. (Gill, Griffin); Greatbatch, Joseph; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Leslie, Frank; Marriage; Parton, James; Patten, Willis; Patten, Willis, Mrs.; Perkins
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight
Description:Includes descriptions of the process of publishing his book, ''The Physiology of New-York Boarding Houses;'' his poor mental state upon returning to New York from England; meeting Walt Whitman; visits with Fanny Fern, James Parton, and Harriet Jacobs' daughter Louisa who is living with them; a visit to the Catskill Mountains with the Edwards family; moving into the boarding house at 132 Bleecker Street; working on the publication ''European'' with Colonel Hugh Forbes; the death of publisher William Levison and his daughter Ellen in his boarding house; visiting the scene of the murder of a dentist to get a sketch of the suspect; visiting Newport, Rhode Island, on assignment to sketch for Frank Leslie; and the death of his brother-in-law, Joseph Greatbatch.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Medical care; Mental illness; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Newport, Rhode Island
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.