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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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long walk to the top of Mount Merena, which rises very
picturesquely from the river, below Hudson.    I carried
a bottle of Scotch ale and sundry feminine knick-knacks.
The day was hot and lovely, the girls needed frequent
pausings, but kept on, though not so untiringly as the
Edwardses during last years Cattskillizing.    When near the
top I left them sitting on the hay by the road side, and
looking at the prospect, while I explored further.  Anon
through a field of tall rye, winding round the mount,
and then took our lunch beneath a shady tree, up
which I subsequently climbed.    Back to dinner by 1, the
girls   especially Miss J   rather used up.         I crossed
to Athens by 6.        Took a walk with Foster and his
wife, and concluded not to return to Hudson to-night.
  10.  Friday.  Good bye to Athens.     With Foster, wife,
children and servant over to the Brooks.       Leaving them
there, he and I rattled back in the coach which had
brought us from the ferry, and whisked per-railroad
five miles down the river bank, then crossing to
Cattskill. (I had this morning got a letter from Alf
Waud announcing his presence in New York   he came
on to see Hart and Dillon   and that he had met
Stone in Boston, on his way to the White Mountains,
with his newly wedded bride.)     To the Cattskill Post-
Office calling on an acquaintance of Fosters, and with
him to a newspaper office   the  Greene County Whig 
where I was introduced to the editor and gave him
a copy of the P. N. Y. B. H, pointing out the passage
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight: page two hundred and four
Description:Describes a walk through the Hudson countryside with Isabel Jacot and Nina Brooks.
Date:1857-07-09
Subject:Brooks, Nina; Foster; Foster, Tilly; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hart; Jacot, Isabel; Mapother, Dillon; Stone, B.G.; Stone, B.G., Mrs.; Travel; Waud, Alfred
Coverage (City/State):Hudson, [New York]; Athens, [New York]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eight
Description:Includes descriptions of the process of publishing his book, ''The Physiology of New-York Boarding Houses;'' his poor mental state upon returning to New York from England; meeting Walt Whitman; visits with Fanny Fern, James Parton, and Harriet Jacobs' daughter Louisa who is living with them; a visit to the Catskill Mountains with the Edwards family; moving into the boarding house at 132 Bleecker Street; working on the publication ''European'' with Colonel Hugh Forbes; the death of publisher William Levison and his daughter Ellen in his boarding house; visiting the scene of the murder of a dentist to get a sketch of the suspect; visiting Newport, Rhode Island, on assignment to sketch for Frank Leslie; and the death of his brother-in-law, Joseph Greatbatch.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Medical care; Mental illness; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Newport, Rhode Island
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.