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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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pend specie payment.    To Parton s in the eve-
ning, having met  Fanny  in the morning, when she in-
vited me.   Haney there.    Rather a slow evening. Parton s
 Life of Aaron Burr  which was on the eve of publication
is indefinitely postponed in deference to the crisis.   He
has written a pamphlet on Crises which Haney will publish.
Returned at night through a dank fog.         I met Briggs in
the cars, going.
  13.  Tuesday.  Drawing and down town.  To Bellew s
lodgings at night.
  14.  Wednesday.  Ditto.  At home   or rather in-doors -
at night.     In Haney s room with Cahill.
  15.  Thursday.   Through the mire and rain to Harpers.
Got paid $36.         Back.    Drawing for Haney, and talking
with Cahill.  Bellew called at sunset. He had been to
Harper s and didn t get paid. (They suspended some four
or five days ago, and don t pay out more than they are ob-
liged to do.     I suppose I owe my luck to my being a new 
contributor.)    Last week s  Harper  contained a whole
page notice of my book.    It was unsolicited, and served
as an excellent introduction to me.    On my presenting my-
self, Bonner showed me the proof sheet, and produced
my P.N.Y.B.H., eulogizing it.
  16.  Friday.   Down town with Cahill.   Met Clarence
Eytinge and Wood, severally.  Calls.   At the Pic Office was in-
troduced by Thomson to his mother and two younger ladies   one
of them shortly to become his wife.  She is very pleasant looking,
with a kind, country face.  Doesticks  chaffs his mother calling
her the  gay and gallant Sophy  and accrediting to her an in-
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nine: page fourteen
Description:Mentions being introduced by Mort Thomson to his mother and fiancee.
Date:1857-10-12
Subject:Bellew, Frank; Bonner, John; Briggs, Charles F.; Cahill, Frank; Eytinge, Clarence; Fern, Fanny; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Parton, James; Thomson, Anna (''Chips''); Thomson, Mortimer (Doesticks); Thomson, Sophy; Wood, John A.
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nine
Description:Includes descriptions of boardinghouse living, a picnic at Hoboken with other New York artists and journalists, his drawing and writing work in New York, attending a lecture by Lola Montez, visits to James Parton and Fanny Fern and the Edwards family, a controversy over Fitz James O'Brien's story ''The Diamond Lens,'' artist Sol Eytinge's relationship with writer Allie Vernon, the suicide of writer Henry William Herbert, antics of the New York Bohemians, the interest of people living in his boarding house in spiritualism, a visit to his friend George Bolton's farm in Canada, a visit to Niagara Falls, and a scandal involving Harbormaster Willis Patten, who lives in his boarding house.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Farms; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Publishers and publishing; Suicide; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Rochester, New York; Elmira, New York; Paris, Ontario, Canada
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.