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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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								179
she had big brothers, he thought he might as well
get married to her.            It was reported that the union
had taken place among Alf and Bill s mutual acquain-
tances and Alf used to contradict it, until, one day,
he questioned his brother, in a shop.  Look here,  said
Alf  am I right in denying that you re married?   Why
didn t you know it?  replies Bill.   Alf said nothing, but
walked away.        A brother of the girls , on the eve of sailing
for London, wanted to get from Will, his mother s address,
that he might call on her.      Bill first denied knowing it,
saying only Alf had it, then told a lie about the family
being travelling in Wales.   He didn t want their real position
to be known, having allowed them   the girls relatives    to en-
tertian very exaggerated ideas of his social sphere in Lon-
don.   This disgusts Alf straight forward nature.     There
is not much union between the brothers.
  13.  Monday.  Blazing away at Story for Harpers.   Out
in the afternoon, meeting Alf and Cahill in front of the
St Nicholas.   Accompanied the former to Ashton Place, lea-
ving him at the corner.       Writing.  O Brien up for Haney,
who presently came to bid me to Edwards .   A letter
from California had informed them that Louisa Edwards
was to be married this day, and her father thought it
only right that a little jollification should celebrate the event.
So he brewed some of his capital punch, the girls were
there, Haney, Cahill and I; we ate cake, drank healths
sang, made speeches and had a good time generally.
  14.  Tuesday.  In doors most of the day.  Waud came
in the morning.  Yesterday he had experienced some disap-
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nine: page two hundred and one
Description:Regarding Will Waud's marriage.
Date:1858-09-12
Subject:Cahill, Frank; Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, George; Edwards, Louisa; Edwards, Martha; Edwards, Sally (Nast); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Marriage; O'Brien, Fitz James; Waud, Alfred; Waud, Mrs.; Waud, William; Waud, William, Mrs.
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nine
Description:Includes descriptions of boardinghouse living, a picnic at Hoboken with other New York artists and journalists, his drawing and writing work in New York, attending a lecture by Lola Montez, visits to James Parton and Fanny Fern and the Edwards family, a controversy over Fitz James O'Brien's story ''The Diamond Lens,'' artist Sol Eytinge's relationship with writer Allie Vernon, the suicide of writer Henry William Herbert, antics of the New York Bohemians, the interest of people living in his boarding house in spiritualism, a visit to his friend George Bolton's farm in Canada, a visit to Niagara Falls, and a scandal involving Harbormaster Willis Patten, who lives in his boarding house.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Farms; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Publishers and publishing; Suicide; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Rochester, New York; Elmira, New York; Paris, Ontario, Canada
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.