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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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her; that Jenny Lind was a mistake,
		with more of horrible and awful
	which listening too indeed proved awful.
Finally when Charley was called to the other end of the shop, she arose,
and with a sort of girlish skip,   (she was over thirty at the mildest) examined
a rope and pulley, and then went off humming an air, perfectly convinced
she had greatly distinguished herself.	  Return to dinner, and during
the remainder of the dismal day indoors.  Sleeping and reading in the afternoon,
and reading  As you like it  aloud to Waud in the evening; he doing the 
same when I waxed hoarse.
  5. Thursday.  In-doors all day, save for a dock walk with Waud at 
the foot of Canal Street. Raw misty atmosphere of rain, muddy pebble
stones, oyster carts, piles of wood of most picturesque color and shapes, docks,
piers, steamers, vessels of all sorts and sizes, Hoboken shore hidden by the
mist which hung a ghostly shroud over the distant vessels, slow drizzle falling 
constant and clammy.       Slept the better part of the Afternoon.  Young
Pelham Anderson called   repeating that but to-day will the perspective reach
Washington, and that the  old man  reporteth auguries-favourable.
  6. Friday.  Rain incessant, and the day passed drearily.  A rush
down town calling in at the Office, and from thence to Corbyn, (who spake
ruefully of Baudoin charging high prices) to Fowler, of Holden s Mag, thence
to Day-book Foster, thence to Butler and Brown s, thence, through pouring
rain to Dean s in Chatham Street, where I learnt that Horace Greely had inserted
the  journey man gold beater  s letter, thence to Canal, and the rest of the
day in-doors. Both of the boy Andersons called in the morning, each to meet 
tother.  Finished letters for Rosa and Naomi.
  7. Saturday.  Straining sheets of paper, when Pelham Anderson came, with
summons from his father, just arrived from Washington. Returned with him
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two: page nineteen
Description:Continues commentary on the ''literary lady.''
Date:1850-12-04
Subject:Anderson; Anderson, Fred; Anderson, Pelham; Baudoin; Butler, Warren; Corbyn, Wardle; Damoreau, Charles (Brown); Foster, George G.; Fowler; Gunn, Naomi; Gunn, Rosa Anna; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Lind, Jenny; Waud, Alfred; Women
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]; Hoboken, [New Jersey]; Washington, [District of Columbia]
Coverage (Street):Canal Street; Chatham Street
Scan Date:2011-02-07

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's attempts to find drawing work among New York publishers, brief employment in an architectural office, visits to his soldier friend William Barth on Governors Island, boarding house living, drawing at actor Edwin Forrest's home at Fonthill Castle, and sailing and walking trips taken with friends.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Books and reading; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Military; Publishers and publishing; Religion; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.