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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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	        Practical Jokes.
debauch and previous ones of my planning,
in retaliation for past squabbles.        I believe
Kettle and the others had resolved, if the Doctor
had appeared, they would have put him out,
in his shirt, on to the leads over Shepherd s
room.   Meantime Cahill and Morris had
fetched Shepherd out of bed, to join the or-
gies.    They all crowded into Boweryem s little
room, then returned to Ledger s, breaking up
about 4 or 5.         I was warned of Morris 
coming up-stairs by his tumbling over chair
on top of them and laughing.     Cahill helped him
to put his room to-rights, then went down to
Ledger s to fetch his pipe, purporting to have
a smoke with Morris, before going to bed.
During his absence, protracted by a drink or
two, Morris, whether seized with the idea that
Cahill had deranged his room or whether simple
inspired by liquor and mischief, went into Cahill s
room and completed my work in a very thorough
manner.    He turned the bedstead up-side down,
put every moveable article, except a chest of drawers,
in a heap upon the floor, moved a variety of
iron ware into the room and on the threshold.
Then he barricaded my door and went to bed.
When Cahill came up, he tumbled about awhile,
then went down stairs and slept with Ledger  
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Twelve: page one hundred and sixteen
Description:Describes a drinking party at his boarding house.
Date:1860-03-24
Subject:Boardinghouses; Boweryem, George; Cahill, Frank; Drunkenness; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Kettle; Kinne; Ledger, Arthur; Morris, James (K. N. Pepper); Shepherd, N.G.
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-01-29

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Twelve
Description:Includes descriptions of boarding house living, his freelance writing and drawing work, antics of the New York literary Bohemians, visits to the Edwards family, the activities of London detective Arthur Ledger who is staying in his boarding house, Thomas Nast's courtship of Sally Edwards, two masked balls at his boarding house, a visit to Lotty Granville at Fordham, the state of Charles Damoreau's marriage, and a visit to the ''Phalanx'' in New Jersey with George Boweryem.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Detectives; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Fordham, New York; New Jersey
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.