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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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	   At 745.     Miscellaneous.
the white-bearded author of  Hot Corn  got into
the cars and talked to Mort, on our down town
trip, on Wednesday.      To 745, saw the three
girls, got opera-tickets and left others for bal-
loon ascension on Saturday, stood chatting and
laughing awhile in the passage.      Then more
calls on schools, then to dinner.         By 5, to
the Book-trade and Numismatic sales, back
to supper, wrote reports, gave Boweryem opera
tickets, sent off reports and by 8 to 745 a-
gain.      A quiet, pleasantish evening, inconceivably
so to me after my late rushing hither and thi-
ther.    The girls all sat and worked round the
table, I among them, between Matty and Sally,
opposite to Parton s mother and Eliza.  Miss Ann
came in presently, and Jack.           Paterfamilias
is at Grafton again.        Haney didn t show,
being at Jim s as might have been conjectured.
  15.  Saturday.  Office.     Writing there till
near 12, then off duty.   Called at F. Leslie s,
saw him and J.A. Wood, at Nic-nax, of-
fice, saw Larrison, at Haney s, Paul s and
more.       Meeting Hitchcock at the portal of
Crook and Duff s he must fain take me in
to see Alf Waud, sitting at the counter, with a
row of men, lunching, Sol Eytinge on one side
of him.      His greeting was not so bearish as
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Thirteen: page two hundred and thirty-two
Description:Mentions visits to the Edwards family and giving George Boweryem opera tickets.
Date:1860-09-14
Subject:Boweryem, George; Edwards, Ann; Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, George; Edwards, John; Edwards, Martha; Edwards, Sally (Nast); Eytinge, Solomon; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Hitchcock; Larason; Leslie, Frank; Parton, James; Parton, Mrs.; Paul; Robinson, Solon; Thomson, Mortimer (Doesticks); Waud, Alfred; Wood, John A.
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-01-29

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Thirteen
Description:Includes descriptions of boarding house living, his freelance writing and drawing work, antics of New York literary Bohemians, Frank Cahill fleeing for England after spending money that was meant for ''The New York Picayune,'' visits to the Edwards family, the state of Charles Damoreau's marriage, a sailing excursion to Nyack with the Edwards family and other friends on the Fourth of July, a fight between Fitz James O'Brien and House at Pfaff's, witnessing a fire at Washington Market, the execution of pirate Albert Hicks on Bedloe's Island, an excursion aboard the ship Great Eastern, a vacation at Grafton with the Edwards family, his growing friendship with Sally Edwards, Lotty Granville's behavior with Brentnall and Hill at his boarding house, Frank Bellew's return to England, and visits to dance houses in the Fourth Ward with friends for an article.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Publishers and publishing; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Grafton, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.