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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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			              June.
 1.  Sunday.  To Anderson s Office, drawing for half an hour, Joe and Fred
there.     Walked to the South Ferry, crossed to Brooklyn, and from thence to
Governors Island.   The wind rising shrilly and strong during the afternoon
induced me to stay the night.   Long book talk in the evening with Barth.
  2. Monday.  Crossed after breakfast, and to Wall Street. Drawing
all day.  Mac in often   narrating how he hath had a row with Anderson,
and designeth quitting.  Dillon called in the evening.   Writing.
  3. Tuesday.  At the Wall Street Office all day; completed landscape greatly
to J B Holmes  content, and with reason.     Letter and newspaper from Alf.
Dillon called, designing a walk.       Writing until far into the night.
Letter to Alf &c.  Critique on the Boston illustrated paper a la  Exterminater .
  4. Wednesday.  Drawing all day the  Running with Machine  picture on
wood.  Holt came and borrowed $5.   Davis called.   Designed writing all
the evening, but the light of the blessed sunset fell so beautifully on the trees ad-
jacent, that I sallied out.  To Duane Street, out with Mr Hart to the
Battery, cigars and converse.   Subsequently in the Park.  Talk of the
Fox imposters, Spirited Knockings &c. This age which cavils at Christian-
ity able to credit that departed spirits will at the summons of paid imposters
play antics applicable to Puck and Friar Rush.   Bah!    /        Returned at
1/2 past 9, and commenced letter for Boutcher.
  5. Thursday.   Drawing all day.  Evening passed, I think in doors,
writing &c.   Joe called.
  6.  Friday.  Drawing.    Dillon Mapother called in the evening; and
about 9 I went out with him; glass of ale & a glance at the London papers at
Reade Street.
  7. Saturday. To Post Office with letter for Boutcher.  Drawing
all day.   No embassy from Holmes with the $7.     After supper off to
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two: page one hundred and eleven
Description:Mentions his work and comments briefly on imposters who claim the ability to summon spirits of the dead.
Date:1851-06-01
Subject:Anderson; Barth, William; Boutcher, William; Greatbatch, Joe; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hart; Holmes, John B.; Mac Namara; Mapother, Dillon; Spiritualism; Waud, Alfred; Writing
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]; Brooklyn, [New York]; Boston, [Massachusetts]
Coverage (Street):Duane Street; Reade Street; Wall Street
Scan Date:2011-02-07

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's attempts to find drawing work among New York publishers, brief employment in an architectural office, visits to his soldier friend William Barth on Governors Island, boarding house living, drawing at actor Edwin Forrest's home at Fonthill Castle, and sailing and walking trips taken with friends.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Books and reading; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Military; Publishers and publishing; Religion; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.