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I saw him, in company with one of his new partners twain.  Thence, a long and 
perspiring,
walk to Madison Street & Moreys the Schnieders.  Trying on breeks & buying summer
coat & the like.     To Mulberry Street, where I dined with Mr Greatbatch & family. Got
two letters from Alf.   To Perry Street & Kentucky Hall. Heat of the weather having
presented attendance of subscribers, pictures are not yet transmited into $.   To Canal
Street.  A letter for Alf, and as I judge by outside initials from his Allom confrere 
 Smawl-
pheelde.   Homer and wife still  [tew hem?].    Again to Madison; & donned and 
paid for
breeks.   Met Morey & imbibed.   Thence, calling at Chamber Street for carpet-bag, 
over to
Brooklyn and Washington Street.  Saw Mrs Peterson, left incumbrances, and after an 
hours
waiting gazing at the river & sunset, got a boat and to Governors Island.   There with
Barth, & part of the time Creesey all evening, and at late hour to bed.  /
 So Alf wroteth that he is in love. And if the girl be as he say, in God s name let
him love on.
  2. Wednesday. Stayed till past noon, wrote letter to Alf &c, while Barth was
taking lesson on guitar from a german, who sang  Es was un K nig in Thule  right
gloriously.  Crossed & found all arranged at 222 Washington Street.   An hour or so,
then to New York, with letters & papers to Post Office.  Called in on J B Holmes, and 
sate awhile.  Mac came.     Return to Brooklyn & supped.  Then to New York again,
to Holts; saw Martin &c.   To Franklin Street.  Mrs Kidder, a Mr Ward, &
anon Mason & Jane Gibson.   Lotty  goeth out  teaching  (dress making I apprehend,) 
and
Miss Brown (of whom the Mr Ward enquired markedly) at the Opera.        Sate till
11.  Mrs K reading remarks Charley Brown dad penned in her journal with comment 
there
on, then took leave, and to Brooklyn.     In tolerably spacious room, over 10 feet in 
height,
& cleanly, looking on trees; converse with a Mr White, my room mate for a season, &
then asleep.
  3. Thursday.  Writing letter to George Bolton during the morning. In
the rear of the afternoon to New York, to Strong s and Genin s, both out.
Called at sat awhile at Chamber Street, a heavy rain storm falling.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two: page one hundred and twenty-seven
Description:Mentions visits to William Barth and Mrs. Kidder.
Date:1851-07-01
Subject:Barth, William; Boardinghouses; Bolton, George; Brown, Margaret; Butler, Warren; Creecey; Damoreau, Charles (Brown); Genin; Gibson, Jane (Mason); Governors Island (New York County, N.Y.); Greatbatch, Joseph; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hall, Alzina; Hall, Homer; Holmes, John B.; Kidder, Charlotte (Whytal, Granville); Kidder, Rebecca (Morse); Mac Namara; Mason; Martin; Morey; Paterson, Mrs.; Songs; Strong, Thomas; Ward; Waud, Alfred; White
Coverage (City/State):New York, [New York]; Brooklyn, [New York]
Coverage (Street):Canal Street; Chamber Street; Franklin Street; Kentucky Hall; Madison Street; Mulberry Street; Perry Street
Scan Date:2011-02-07

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's attempts to find drawing work among New York publishers, brief employment in an architectural office, visits to his soldier friend William Barth on Governors Island, boarding house living, drawing at actor Edwin Forrest's home at Fonthill Castle, and sailing and walking trips taken with friends.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Books and reading; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Military; Publishers and publishing; Religion; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.