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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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and again return, (if of no great thought or education,) go back quite Anti Republican. / 
When
I got back to Washington Street, found the folks all in converse. /  I think the greatest
snob not unfrequently lionizes most  mong common place people, unless we book 
readers care to cut
him out in a cool way, Now here s our comic man Keating,   he s a good humored
fellow, has a smattering of information, & that s all; selects White as his butt, who
has more sense & earnestness by far than he.     Dismal creatures these  funny men , as
are all who must be shining.                    I miss Alf Waud extremely.
  14 Monday.  Drawing the  Monkey picture  on wood all the morning &c.  Evening
to New York, purchasing the current number of Gleason, with my  Castle William 
drawing in it.     To Mr Greatbatchs, & there all the evening. No letters either
from home, or Alf Waud.
  15. Tuesday. To New York.  Passing by Strongs was called in, with him mutually
to condemn the result of an Engravers labours on the  Running with Machine .  The 
unhappy
wretch had actually flayed my drawing; inasmuch that Strong would nt use the block nor
would I have him to.   Engraver (Knight) was his name did nt get paid, & intimated 
his
intention of going to Boston, there to offer his valuable services to Gleason.   /   Posted 
note
for Alf & newspapers. Then making a drawing of block of houses in Broadway, to the
interest of pedestrians.  While thus engaged was accosted by Ben Haun, who told me
that he was that day going off down east for his health.   Back, and at Brooklyn
during the remainder of the day.
  16. Wednesday.  Ill all day, bile &c, emetic taking, vomiting and in pain all
the time, unable to do anything.  Folks very kind about me, in special the good temper-
ed wife of the man in next room. ^|Mrs Dunsier| Born in Maine, with a good tempered 
 Bermodha  born hus-band.
  17. Thursday.  Drawing till sunset, and so little content with the result, that I then
obliterated all, to commence again.     To Mulberry Street. Still no letters.  Out with
Joe & the boys to Moreys.  There, invited to brandy and water-imbibition by him, in
conjunction with two other arrivals, one of whom was full of a recent encounter with an
Irish carman, in which he had been victor.  Morey playing fiddle, sitting on a bed
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two: page one hundred and thirty-six
Description:Mentions being ill and visiting Morey.
Date:1851-07-13
Subject:Boardinghouses; Drawing; Dunsier; Dunsier, Mrs.; Gleason; Greatbatch, Edward (Bristol); Greatbatch, Fred (Bristol); Greatbatch, Joe; Greatbatch, Joseph; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haun, Ben; Keating; Knight; Morey; Strong, Thomas; Waud, Alfred; White
Coverage (City/State):New York, [New York]; Brooklyn, [New York]; Boston, [Massachusetts]
Coverage (Street):Broadway; Mulberry Street
Scan Date:2011-02-07

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Two
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's attempts to find drawing work among New York publishers, brief employment in an architectural office, visits to his soldier friend William Barth on Governors Island, boarding house living, drawing at actor Edwin Forrest's home at Fonthill Castle, and sailing and walking trips taken with friends.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Books and reading; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Military; Publishers and publishing; Religion; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.