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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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             His Loves and Declamation.
rosettes and all that sort of thing.   He ll tell
me of it presently.   He s a good little chap but
a frightful offender against the Bohemian rule
promulgated at Pfaff s by George Arnold, being,
dreadfully prone towards making a d____d fool
of himself.   The girl is fair-faced and light
haired; they know nothing of each others natures
or dispositions   in fact the whole thing is appro-
bativeness and assininity.      He was in love with
Mary Bucklin; with Philadelphian Sally; with
Lizzy Woodward (if she hadn t tartly nipped
the Brussels  sprouts of his young affections); with
whom you please.          He talks of returning from
the war with  a pair of eponlettes,  and actually
took his  Ode to Liberty  and got permission to
read it to the  Scott Guard.     Private Boweryem
will read us a poem  On Liberty,  of his Own Com-
position!  announced the Colonel, when the little
man stept forth and spouted;   
   Of thy glories sacred Liberty! the choral stars
are singing   
    And so on.   Of course he d say glowies and
chowal staws, as he can t utter the dog s letter.
Ladies asked him for copies subsequently, which
delighted him immensely.       He told Cahill
all this; thereby preventing his coming up stairs
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Sixteen: page one hundred and twenty-six
Description:Comments on George Boweryem's engagement and previous loves.
Date:1861-04-21
Subject:Arnold, George; Bohemians; Boweryem, George; Bucklin, Mary; Cahill, Frank; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Pfaff�s (New York, N.Y.); Poetry; Sally; Webster, Adrienne; Woodward, Lizzie (Fite)
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2010-06-01

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Sixteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of the scene in New York at the commencement of the Civil War, boarding house living, visits to the Edwards family, Mort Thomson's engagement to Fanny Fern's daughter Grace Eldredge, Frank Cahill's return to New York from London, Frank Bellew's dissatisfaction with living in England, Thomas Nast's engagement to Sally Edwards, the scene in New York during the departure of the 7th New York Regiment for Washington, attending the wedding of Olive Waite and Hamilton Bragg, a visit with Frank Cahill to the camp of the 1st Regiment of New York Volunteers and the 2nd Regiment of New York State Militia on Staten Island, the death of Charles Welden, and his reporting work.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Military; Publishers and publishing; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.