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          Bryant and the  Evening Post. 
and Stockton joined me subsequently, but left
about 10.   Writing.      Cahill boards here now.
He got $7 from the  Times,  for reporting last week
and Seymour helps him.     So he has paid Mrs. Bo-
ley $4 for a week s partial board, breakfast and
supper, in advance.     His embezzlement appears
to have amounted to just $247.99.            He has
gone over the records with Larason.
  23.  Tuesday.   Down-town with Cahill, he
to  Times,  I to the  Evening Post  office.   Saw Bry-
ant; was referred to Henderson; who told me af-
ter some parley that they had four correspondents in
track of the War; three paid ones.     While we were
talking, there came by in the street, a rough-looking
volunteer  naval brigade,  who cheered for the paper,
and an old Bryant putting out his white head at
an upper window, cheered for him, and their lea-
der, a hoarse and excited person, offered to bring
Jeff. Davis  head to the editor if he wanted it.
To the  Tribune  office.   Dana according an inter-
view to a man who had called to impress him with
the one idea that no treaty could be made with
the South; its inhabitants were all perjurers &c.
My business was soon dispatched: Dana didn t
know whether the  Tribune  might nt want another
War Correspondent and took my address.        Then
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Sixteen: page one hundred and twenty-eight
Description:Mentions visiting the ''Evening Post'' and the ''New York Tribune'' attempting to get work as a war correspondent.
Date:1861-04-21
Subject:Boardinghouses; Boley, Susan; Bryant (editor); Cahill, Frank; Civil War; Dana, Charles A.; Davis, Jefferson; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Henderson; Journalism; Larason; New York evening post.; New York tribune.; Seymour, Charles (Bailey); Stockton
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2010-06-01

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Sixteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of the scene in New York at the commencement of the Civil War, boarding house living, visits to the Edwards family, Mort Thomson's engagement to Fanny Fern's daughter Grace Eldredge, Frank Cahill's return to New York from London, Frank Bellew's dissatisfaction with living in England, Thomas Nast's engagement to Sally Edwards, the scene in New York during the departure of the 7th New York Regiment for Washington, attending the wedding of Olive Waite and Hamilton Bragg, a visit with Frank Cahill to the camp of the 1st Regiment of New York Volunteers and the 2nd Regiment of New York State Militia on Staten Island, the death of Charles Welden, and his reporting work.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Military; Publishers and publishing; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.