Lehigh University
The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
Previous Issue Next Issue
Previous Page Next Page
0 matches
				15
loving and most unaffectedly pious Hannah!
  of whom I am altogether unworthy.
  Jim Parton told Haney about the marriage
arrangements.        Got home about 2 A. M.
  21.  Friday.   Down town by noon, met Bow-
eryem at Weston s; to two places with him, then
to State Street, anon up-town, through the rain,
to dinner.      Out again at 5.        Writing during
the evening.           When I was in the  Evening
Post  office this morning, behind the counter, Ad-
dey came in, to purchase a newspaper.       I had a
talk with him.      He said he wasn t doing any-
thing   hadn t money too; declared that the man
in England on whom he had given an order for
money, in payment of Bellew, was dishonest; and
talked about going in the country, to live economical-
ly.      I didn t dun him.      He showed me a poem
of his writing, an intended National American
anthem, one of the thousand and more sent in,
in answer to a public advertisement for the same
  which he had, also, got set to music and pub-
lished.      It is wholesome to know the regard
that these poetasters entertain for one another;
Boweryem always depreciates Stedman, Sted-
man affects a candid disparagement of the poetry
of his friend, Aldrich, and Shepherd comment-
ed laughingly on Boweryem s speaking of his
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Seventeen: page twenty-one
Description:Comments on poets of his acquaintance and how they regard one another.
Date:1861-06-20
Subject:Addey; Aldrich, Thomas Bailey; Bellew, Frank; Bennett, Hannah; Boweryem, George; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Parton, James; Poetry; Shepherd, N.G.; Stedman, Edmund Clarence
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Coverage (Street):State Street
Scan Date:2010-06-09

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Seventeen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of the scene in New York at the commencement of the Civil War; his visits to military camps in and around New York City as a reporter for ""The New York Evening Post;"" boarding house living; a bridal reception at the Edwards family's residence in honor of the marriage of Sally Edwards and Thomas Nast; a visit to the Heylyn and Rogers families in Rochester; and his trip to Paris, Ontario, to visit George Bolton and the Conworths.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Military; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Paris, Ontario, Canada ; Rochester, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.