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         Gambling Hells & Concert Saloons.
Broadway.    One was well, the other handsomely
furnished; the first had a nude, indecent and
ill-drawn Venus in oil ornamenting the wall, and
both places had negro attendants.    There was but
one player in each, and he, I have no doubt a
professional make-believe.  Secession has affected this
trade as well as others.         The gambler was kind
enough to say he d like to see me win $5 but did-
n t experience it   or the other contingency. He also
propsed, first to me, and then to Hart, to pilot
us to certain fashionable brothels, which offer was
not accepted.    Between our visits to the dreary
deserted hells, we descended to one of the numerous
singing and drinking saloons on Broadway, and
sat there, witnessing a dramatic duet, in Ger-
man, drinking lager and weiss-bier and obser-
ving the frequenters of the place.  The waitresses
were German, tawdrily dressed and generally
ugly; they mingled freely in conversation with the
visitors, many of whom appeared vastly enter-
tained, with their forward vulgarity and dreary
familiarities.      Of course they were ex officio, all
prostitutes.       We parted at 11.
  4.  Friday.   Writing to Hannah.   In the eve-
ning, at 9  , dropped in at 745.   Haney there,
the girls, Miss Griswold, a little Miss Weddle
and Mr. Edwards.       Mat looked pretty in her
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Seventeen: page two hundred and twenty-five
Description:Describes visits to gambling halls and concert saloons with Hart and German.
Date:1861-10-03
Subject:African Americans; Bennett, Hannah; Civil War; Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, George; Edwards, Martha; Gambling; Griswold, Miss; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Weddle, Miss
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Coverage (Street):Broadway
Scan Date:2010-06-15

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Seventeen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of the scene in New York at the commencement of the Civil War; his visits to military camps in and around New York City as a reporter for ""The New York Evening Post;"" boarding house living; a bridal reception at the Edwards family's residence in honor of the marriage of Sally Edwards and Thomas Nast; a visit to the Heylyn and Rogers families in Rochester; and his trip to Paris, Ontario, to visit George Bolton and the Conworths.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Military; Publishers and publishing; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Paris, Ontario, Canada ; Rochester, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.