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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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						23
	         Ham s Grievances.
was at Fan s to-night.       Sat and chatted for
an hour or two, when Mr. E. descended, anon
Jack, then Mrs. E.        Evening passed well enough.
In a chance remark of Jack, abetted by his mother,
I noticed a smack of descendentalism, which has, I
think, obtained throughout the family, qualifying
its old enchantment.          Honeywell has been sick
  spat blood from some minor internal rupture, as
Eliza ascertained during a chance visit to his mother.
There was something said about Mrs. E. sending
Matty to enquire after him subsequently.     Left at
10  .           Invited to a little rere-supper of lobster
in our basement, by our landlady, I found Ham sitting one one
side of the table talking to Jewitt.      She was setting
forth her general disinterestedness, generosity and
virtue and the ungratitude of mankind, especially
of her sisters, relatives and friends, in the
usual feminine and Celtic style, insomuch that
when she left I was not surprised to hear from
old, Jewitt that  an aristocratic coolness  has begun
to exist between her and the Lee s, based on the
two latter having mulvathered Clark exclusively,
so that they share bottles of gin and pitchers of
beer in the actress s room nocturnally, without
inviting Ham, who is naturally injured there-
fore.     Jewitt predicts a general row between the
women.     Please Heaven!    I d see them scalp
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eighteen: page thirty
Description:Regarding troubles among the women boarders at his boarding house.
Date:1861-10-29
Subject:Boardinghouses; Boley, Susan; Clark, Mrs. (Kate Fisher); Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, George; Edwards, John; Edwards, Martha; Edwards, Sarah; Fern, Fanny; Food; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Ham, Mrs.; Honeywell, Charles; Honeywell, Mrs.; Jewett; Leahy, Anastatia; Leahy, Miss; Women
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2010-06-14

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Eighteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of the scene in New York at the commencement of the Civil War, his visits to military camps in and around New York City as a reporter for ""The New York Evening Post,"" boarding house life, the shooting of Sergeant Davenport by Captain Fitz James O'Brien for insubordination, and Frank Bellew's marital troubles.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Military; Publishers and publishing; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.