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   Davis on W. Waud at Charleston.  Anderson,
	     Hendricks, Quigg and Buckstone.
good-natured Irishman who had tolerated his
company and protected him.    This young fel-
low was in Charleston S. C. soon after the
bombardment of Sumter and told me that the
officers had showed him one of three guns of
which Bill Waud had pulled the lanyard during 
the attack.     They called it  Waud s gun. 
(It s probable enough.)   W. W. is now at New
Orleans or near it, sketching for F. Leslie.  This
young Davis lodged at the Hygeia in a room
adjacent to Halls and mine.      In it, with Hen-
dricks and Anderson, whom I last recollect on
the Harriet Lane, when the Prince of Wales came
to New York. (Fontin of the Herald died of con-
sumption, some time ago.)      David chums with
Anderson.       Napoleonx Quigg, ( Phoebus! what
a name!) of the World, whom I met to-day, told
me that Buckstone alias Ramsay had been
recently captured by the rebels at or near Win-
chester, and that very probably they would hang
him as a spy.     (I think this must have been
erroneous: Buckstone was apprehended by
the U. S. authorities, kept in the Old Capitol
prison for some months and finally set free, on
condition that he wouldn t show his spotty face
south of New York again.     Alf Waud saw him
in prison.)       Quigg knew Buckstone as a clerk,
guilty of embezzlement or some pecuniary villany
   x Bestowed upon him by Rawlings.  His name was John.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen: page eighty-four
Description:Regarding conversations with Davis and Napoleon Quigg.
Date:1862-03-26
Subject:Anderson (reporter); Civil War; Davis (artist); Firearms; Fontin; Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.); Frank Leslie's illustrated news.; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hall (artist); Hendricks; New York herald; New York world.; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Quigg, John; Ramsay, Russell (Buckstone); Rawlings, Augustus; Waud, Alfred; Waud, William
Coverage (City/State):[Hampton, Virginia]; Charleston, South Carolina
Scan Date:2010-06-14

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of his experiences as a war correspondent for ""The New York Tribune"" in Virginia while traveling with the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign; the Siege of Yorktown; the Battle of Williamsburg; his departure from Alexandria on the steamer Kent; the ruins of Hampton, Virginia, after it was burnt by John B. Magruder; touring the gunboat Monitor; the death of Fitz James O'Brien from a gunshot wound; Jim Parton's temporary separation from Fanny Fern; and seeing Robert E. Lee's house in Virginia.
Subject:Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marches (U.S. Army); Marriage; Medical care (U.S. Army); Military; Military camp life; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Prisoners of war (Confederate); Siege of Yorktown (Va.); Slavery; Slaves; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Washington, District of Columbia; Alexandria, Virginia; Hampton, Virginia; Yorktown, Virginia; Williamsburg, Virginia
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.