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	In Yorktown.     My horse lost
photographs.     Found Alf Waud and some
of the Signal Corps; rambling about with them
in the scenes described in the printed letter (one
half of which, relating the feeling about Mc Clellan,
was suppressed   for the Tribune was then trying
to ignore its past wholesome denunciation of the little
humbug.)    Peeped into Cornwallis Cave, occupied
as a Magazine, rather scaring the fellows, who ap-
prehended torpedoes.  In and atop of the Court
house, where I was diligently scribbling, when some
fellows of the 22nd Mass came up and were ex-
tremely interested in a copy of the Tribune which
I possessed, containing the sketch inserted at page
142, which I had sent on to the paper.              Going
below I met Col. Berdan, who of course attributed
the evacuation of Yorktown to the prowress of the
Sharpshooters.    He was urgent that I should go
back to his camp, dine with and glorify him.    At
this juncture Hall turned up, having procured a
horse from Bement, and made some good sketches.
Encountered Sam Wilkeson, whose horse   a
fine animal for which he had paid at least $200
  had been stolen.  Almost at the same time to my
horror I discovered that my beast had got loose
from the staple to which I had fastened him and
was invisible!     Instituted a half frantic search
and was jut going to steal another horse, one
of three or four which I found caparisoned under
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen: page one hundred and eighty-one
Description:Regarding losing his horse.
Date:1862-05-04
Subject:Bement, Major; Berdan, Hiram; Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hall (artist); Horses; Journalism; Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, 22nd; McClellan, George B.; Military; New York tribune.; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Siege of Yorktown (Va.); United States Army, Signal Corps; United States Sharpshooters Regiment, 1st; Waud, Alfred; Wilkeson, Samuel
Coverage (City/State):Yorktown, [Virginia]
Scan Date:2010-06-17

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of his experiences as a war correspondent for ""The New York Tribune"" in Virginia while traveling with the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign; the Siege of Yorktown; the Battle of Williamsburg; his departure from Alexandria on the steamer Kent; the ruins of Hampton, Virginia, after it was burnt by John B. Magruder; touring the gunboat Monitor; the death of Fitz James O'Brien from a gunshot wound; Jim Parton's temporary separation from Fanny Fern; and seeing Robert E. Lee's house in Virginia.
Subject:Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marches (U.S. Army); Marriage; Medical care (U.S. Army); Military; Military camp life; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Prisoners of war (Confederate); Siege of Yorktown (Va.); Slavery; Slaves; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Washington, District of Columbia; Alexandria, Virginia; Hampton, Virginia; Yorktown, Virginia; Williamsburg, Virginia
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.