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[newspaper clipping]
CHARLES A. DANA
	LIES AT REST.
	        
The Editor of the Sun Expires at
  His Summer Home Near Glen
     Cove, L. I., from Cirrhosis
	of the Liver.
	        
AWAITED HIS END
	LIKE A PHILOSOPHER.
	        
Knowing the Disease from Which he
  Was Suffering Was Fatal, He Fought
     His Fight Bravely to the End.
	        
SURROUNDED BY HIS FAMILY.
	        
He Was Able to Recognize His Chil-
  dren, as He Died with His Brow
     Pressed by Their Lips.
	        
GREAT EDITOR AND STATESMAN.
	        
He Stood in the Front Rank of Jour-
  nalism and Kept His Fingers
     Upon the Pulse of the World.
	        
  Charles A. Dana, editor of the Sun, died at
his home, Dosoris Island, near Glen Cove, L.
I., yesterday afternoon at twenty minutes
past one o clock, at the age of seventy-eight.
Surrounded by his children, ripe in the great
love of his intimates, honored and revered,
the editor saw the sunlight for the last time
when, amid the splendors of a perfect day,
all nature about him seemed aglow.
  His farewell was the pressure upon his
forehead of the lips of his children.  Death
had not come suddenly at the closing of his
long life.  The warning had been given with
the beginning of the summer, and life passed
away on the day when summer had become
but a memory.  The end was as peaceful as
the life had been vibrant in thought and ac-
tion.
  It was recognized early last week by Mr.
Dana s physician and son-in-law.  Dr. Wil-
liam H. Draper, that death was near.  From
the time when the manifestrations of the dis-
ease cirrhosis of the liver from which Mr.
Dana died, became plainly eviden last June.
it was appreciated even by Mr. Dana that
the final scene was fast approaching.  Yet
so delusive were the symptoms of the malady
that at various periods during his last illness
Mr. Dana seemed to regain the virility of
thought and deed which had marked his
great accomplishments, and hope, which was
nearly extinguished, revived again.
	INDICATED HIS PAPER S POLICY.
  During these intervals of strength, Mr.
Dana was visited by the men, who, as assist-
ant editors had been in his confidence so long,
and to them he indicated what should be the
policy of the newspaper over whose destinies
he presided.  He was immensely interested in
the politial situation, and though he had laid
down the pen for all time, yet it was his in-
spiration which pointed the editorial support
of the republican ticket.
  But the progress of the disease was not to
be stayed.  The immediate members of his
family were summoned last week.  They were
informed that they must expect the worst at
any time.  The dying editor, however, had be-
come the expiring philosopher, and he
watched the clouds approach wth the seren-
ity of content.  While no word was given him
of the immediate possibilities, he thoroughly
appreciated them and was prepared.
  The beginning of the end was on Saturday.
The warmth and beauty of the day seemed
to act most favorably, and he expressed a de-
sire that he should once more pass among his
magnificent collections of ceramics and en-
joy them to the fullest.  His wish was granted.
Supported by his nurses and accompanied by
his children and children-in-law, he was taken
through the great rooms he had loved so well
and had labored with so much devotion to
make beautiful.  The exertion proved too
much, however.  The disease apparently

[engraving]
	CHARLES A. DANA.
  	    Editor of the Sun.

[newspaper clipping continued]
ready to seize upon any sudden weakening of
the heart, overcame his fancied strength and
he fainted.
	HIS DEATH NEARLY PAINLESS.
  From that time on until he passed away he
was conscious only at rare intervals and for
short periods.  Yesterday morning his heart
and pulse became so weak that death was
expected momentarily, and his family in-
cluding Mrs. Dana, Mr. Paul Dana, Mrs. 
Paul Dana, Mrs. Underhill, Mrs. Brannan
and Mrs. Draper, his daughters, never left
him.  A few moments before he breathed his
last he opened his eyes and seemed to recog-
nize his children, though he was so weak
that he did not articulate above the most
indistinct whisper.  His death was nearly
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen: page two hundred and sixty-five
Description:Newspaper clipping regarding the death of newspaper editor Charles Dana.
Date:1897-10-18
Subject:Brannan, Mrs.; Dana, Charles A.; Dana, Charles A., Mrs.; Dana, Paul; Dana, Paul, Mrs.; Draper, William H.; Draper, William H., Mrs.; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; New York sun.; Obituaries; Underhill, Mrs.
Coverage (City/State):Glen Cove, New York
Scan Date:2010-06-17

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Nineteen
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of his experiences as a war correspondent for ""The New York Tribune"" in Virginia while traveling with the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign; the Siege of Yorktown; the Battle of Williamsburg; his departure from Alexandria on the steamer Kent; the ruins of Hampton, Virginia, after it was burnt by John B. Magruder; touring the gunboat Monitor; the death of Fitz James O'Brien from a gunshot wound; Jim Parton's temporary separation from Fanny Fern; and seeing Robert E. Lee's house in Virginia.
Subject:Civil War; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marches (U.S. Army); Marriage; Medical care (U.S. Army); Military; Military camp life; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Prisoners of war (Confederate); Siege of Yorktown (Va.); Slavery; Slaves; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Washington, District of Columbia; Alexandria, Virginia; Hampton, Virginia; Yorktown, Virginia; Williamsburg, Virginia
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.