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40                  
                   At 745 Broadway.
boarding-house to see me, having just re-
ceived a note I had written to him from Vir-
ginia.  We walked into Washington Square
together, sat down and had a talk and
then rode down-town by omnibus.  Left him
and went to the Tribune office.  A very kind
reception from Wilbour, England and Gay.
Uptown by omnibus.  To 745 in the evening,
in the room upstairs : Mr and Mrs Edwards,
Jim Parton, Anne, Eliza and Matty present,
also Reynolds, and anon Haney.  The talk
ran mostly on the war and my recent ex-
periences.  Parton, I remember, professed
his inability to make up his mind about
the character of McClellan; and quite ad-
mired the tact of Bennett of the Herald in
championing him   thus procuring favors
and facilities for its correspondence.  This
admiration of mere success I always noticed
in Jim, regarding it as an unsafe, a danger-
ous quality, indicating weakness in its possess-
or : its the worst part of Carlylism, which I,
for my part, am not going to accept as gos-
pel.  At this very period, too, Parton was
vacillating in purpose and inclining to return
to the woman who had made him so wretched,
which he did, shortly afterwards.  Haney.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Twenty: page forty-eight
Description:Regarding Gunn's return to the Tribune office.
Date:1862-06-05
Subject:Bennett (reporter); Civil War; Edwards, Ann; Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, George; Edwards, Martha; Edwards, Sarah; England; Fern, Fanny; Gay, Sidney H.; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Haney, Jesse; Journalism; McClellan, George B.; New York herald.; New York tribune.; Parton, James; Reynolds; Wilbour
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Coverage (Street):745 Broadway; Washington Square
Scan Date:2010-09-10

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Twenty
Description:Includes Gunn's descriptions of his experiences as a war correspondent for ""The New York Tribune"" at Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, especially Hilton Head, Port Royal, St. Augustine, Key West, and the end of his experiences with the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign when he had to leave camp due to illness.
Subject:African Americans; Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Civil War; Diseases; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marches (U.S. Army); Medical care (U.S. Army); Military; Military camp life; Peninsular Campaign (Va.); Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Port Royal, South Carolina; Hilton Head, South Carolina; Key West, Florida; St. Augustine, Florida; Virginia
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2010 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.