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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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as a sorrowful fact that I shall walk through life alone, never
knowing the dear privileges, the trust, the faith, the unutterable
tenderness of Loving and being loved.          And yet, methinks
now it s harder to give up the hope of hearing the word
 Father  than  Husband.          I never see a pretty child but
it sets me musing after this fashion .   I long to own them, to
pet them, to love them and teach them to love me,   to make
an ass of mtself to any extent for them.       There s nothing more
beautiful in Gods  earth than children.      They are the only sincere
people I know, out of books.        /                All to bed
at about 11, a little room to ourselves with four berths in t.
Snug cleanly beds, hot atmosphere .  Waud in the lower berth
was soon asleep, as was Dillon .   I and Mr Hart talked
awhile; anon he dropped off,     I lay looking out at the
solemn moonlight on the water,  the dark moving river banks, &
occasionally at a passing soul, thinking over many things till
I fell asleep.
  12.  Tuesday.  New York by 4 o clock.  All ashore &
parting I walked to my room, opened closed blinds, admitted sun-
light & had a good wash.     Anon down town to breakfast
at Goslings, called at Post Office, at Bunnell & Price s, at
Wells & Webbs, & Strongs.      Drawing all the afternoon.  Mr
Hart & Dillon called once.       Evening to Beach Street.  Mrs
Kidder up stairs whist playing with Morse, &c     Lotty came.
Talking with her till 11, then left.
  13.  Wednesday. Down town to breakfast, Picayune Office &
Strong s.     Divers folks called at my Office, Hutching s &c.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page twenty-two
Description:Describes his return to New York from the Catskill Mountains, and comments on his love of children.
Date:1853-07-11
Subject:Children; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Hart; Hutchings; Kidder, Charlotte (Whytal, Granville); Kidder, Rebecca (Morse); Mapother, Dillon; Morse; Travel; Waud, Alfred
Coverage (City/State):New York, [New York]
Coverage (Street):Beach Street
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.