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waiting, though the rain had cleared off, leaving an Iris, and a 
beautiful sunset.      But as we got off, all sitting, (ladies included) on
baggage,)  twas overclouded again   and rain  gan fall.   A wild
prospect     Huge rock boulders, the water to the right and before
us, great tree roots uptorn and blackened, pools and dykes. At
the Sam Ward atlength.     Across another boat to her.  A decent
steamboat.      Found friend Montgomery, and with Swan was inducted
into a delectable State Cabin, forward, night to Barbers shop.    We
two alone have it.    Tossed for berths & he won the lower on.       I
down stairs talking with his sister.   A pleasant faced, though not hand-
some home-loving woman,  told me she could set up types, and was
rather weary of this travel, wishing herself at home.  An hour thus,
then above and about.    We have started within half an hour after
embarkation.   Not over crowded, but no lack of folk, and I have as
yet found none disagreeable.    Most amusing varieties of character.    I
do like thy frank, manly natured, unaffected good sense of American
character, that granite of character, independence.  Evening wore on.
Dancing and music in the ladies cabin, colored barber playing
guitar, others the flute and violin.     Cotillions.  /      Out on
the fore-deck, conversing with the Captain, a manly, good look-
ing sturdy fellow; and an old Captain in these Lakes.    Then
below in the bar-saloon with Swan and the Captain.  The
latter tracing our course on the map.    We go to the most western
extremity.        Fellows playing cards behind, Mc Elrath one of
 em.     And one, and sturdy, bold looking young fellow
of Front de Lac, said he had 6 Indian wives.    If I d
visit him I should have the handsomest Indian girl in the place
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page fifty-nine
Description:Describes his arrival on the steamboat ''Sam Ward,'' which will be taking him on a tour of Lake Superior.
Date:1853-08-13
Subject:African Americans; Compston, Miss; Estabrook, Captain; Great Lakes (North America); Gunn, Thomas Butler; McElrath, Thomson; Montgomery; Sam. Ward (Ship); Swan; Transportation; Travel
Coverage (City/State):[Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.