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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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till a winding path being reached we pursue it for twenty minutes or
so, at length arriving to where, almost hidden by trees, and rising
from a mound of earth, decaying leaves & vegetation of which all the
soil thereabouts is composed, a great mass of rock appeared, inside
which, hollowed out by Nature is a small cave, spacious enough to
stand up in, rough, damp and rocky.      Tis known as Scott s cave
from it s discoverer.   /                 Bathing every fine afternoon with
Barth, generally below the Folly Rock, sometimes when the surf
came rolling in with grand-hollow roar on pebbly beach and rock base,
sometimes when only a calm ripple fretted the lake-floor, which clear
as crystal showed every stone and rock below.     High above, the yellowish
white lime-stone rock shews out strongly against, green foliage and introub-
led blue sky.    Anon a tranquil smoke as we lay rolling in the bles-
sed sun-light, with talk on many things; then back to the Suttler s
store were Barth dispensed beer to thirty German or Irish soldiers,
duly crouching the amount consumed to be hereafter paid for when they got
paid.       I drawing away on Picayune blocks meanwhile; the writing I did
over at the House, Mrs Barth moving silently about her household duties,
or sometimes discursively talking, the which might perchance delay my scribblings
a little, but was quite the reverse of unpleasing.       Evenings, I would light
my long Indian pipe, Barth his ollindeen, & we d talk. Of books, of
man, of Earth and Heaven, things past, present and to be   A pleasant
time surely.  Somewhat busier than I d wish to be, but  tis pleasant em-
ploy, & little desire have I to cavil at it.
  10. Saturday.   Having projected a sail-boat excursion to Old Fort
Michillimackinac, in company with Barth & one Logan, a Scots-
Border born farmer living on the Island; we were about setting
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six: page one hundred and four
Description:Describes time spent on Mackinac Island visiting William Barth.
Date:1853-09-09
Subject:Barth, William; Barth, William, Mrs.; Great Lakes (North America); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Logan; Mackinac Island (Mich.); Travel
Coverage (City/State):[Mackinac Island, Michigan]
Scan Date:2011-02-02

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Six
Description:Includes descriptions of Gunn's writing and drawing work in New York, a visit to the Catskill Mountains, attending the wedding of his friend Charles Damoreau (Brown), a visit to the Crystal Palace in New York, his friend Lotty's difficult marriage to John Whytal, a sailing trip around Lake Superior, a visit to Mackinac Island in Michigan, a visit to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, and a journey by horseback from Kentucky to Louisiana with friends.
Subject:African Americans; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marriage; Native Americans; Publishers and publishing; Slavery; Travel; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Michigan; Wisconsin; Ohio; Kentucky; Mississippi; Alabama; Louisiana
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.