Lehigh University
The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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Text for Page 071

              [newspaper clipping continued]
walls were built of solid masonry two feet thick [word cut off]
rose to the height of four stories.  In front of the
second line of long, low windows was placed a 
wide iron balcony, running across the front of the
block and making a covered promenade from Sul-
livan to Thompson street.  At either end of the
long building is a wide entrance and between these
are two slightly smaller doors.  These entrances
are the only means of approach to the four houses
which compose Depau row.
  Passing into the door at the lower end of the
block the visitor finds himself in an inclosed court.
The pavement is nicely laid with huge slabs of care-
fully fitted slate, with a raised walk on either side.
Four solid walls of brick surround the driveway
which leads to the stables in the rear, and stained-
glass windows light the little court.  On the left
hand, in the centre of the court, four steps lead up
to the wide door with cut-glass side-lights and a
handsome brass reflector hanging over the en-
trance.  The floor of the hall is paved with alter-
nate white and black tiles, and the double staircase
winds up like an arch on either side, filling the en-
tire space at the back of the hall.  The original
stairs have long since been worn away by the heavy
boots of the present occupants, but the carved
mahogany balustrade still remains.

[engraving of building entrance]

DRIVEWAY OF MR. STEWART�S FORMER RESIDENCE.
  On each side of the paved hall a heavy mahogany
door opens into a large, square room.  The front
apartment, facing on Bleecker street, was formerly
a dining-room, and its first inhabitant was no less a
person than A. T. Stewart.  Here the famous
millionaire sat down to the most elaborate dinners
that the market could afford, and here his friends,
the wealthiest men of New York, gathered about
him to enjoy the wines, which were the pride of
their host�s heart.  A special agent, a connoisseur,
was constantly employed by Stewart to stock his 
cellars.               
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