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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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Text for Page 148 [07-29-1851]

              Bulwer�s Caxton�s.  One thing it shall teach me.  No more unmanly
regrets [word crossed out] � that passion has occupied too much of my life, and has
rendered my mind morbid.     Out with�t � and be weary of again befooling thyself
with another.
  30.  Wednesday.  At Holmes morning and afternoon.   Called at Andersons. Evening
told Mrs Spatterson of my approaching Exodus, whereat she said � Very well!�  To the 
At-
lantic Street Dock where I got a note from Bharf, in reply to one I transmitted with
fowl shyrtes in the morn.   Met Macnamara, and talk of Anderson, (of his debts &
doings.    Met Dunsiere & Fagan, the latter of whom left yesterday & now abideth with 
the
Dunsiere�s.   Talk awhile of an embryo sell for Keating, then parted.
  31. Thursday. Stuffing carpet bag & loading myself, then a weary walk to New
York Leonard Street, the traps being fearfully heavy.   Stowed them away in temporary
room nigh to the aether, then to Wall Street.     Back for dinner, � a cheering con-
trast to the last weeks dinners. Large, long, high room, some fifteen boarders. 
Holmes�s
again, finished big landscape, another to do on the morrow.     Evening after supper,
(good again,) to Canal Street for things.  Some time there; back, putting things in
order &c, and now here sit I, again on the Island of Manna-hatta, and tol-
erably well content at the result of my change.     I never witnessed such dodgery done
in the way of provant transmogryfying as at that same 222 Washington Street Brooklyn.
Then didn�t do such at Jersey, even.  /     Started the Hoax for Keating to-day, thus
Holmes is to give friendly warning to Mrs Paterson on behalf of Keating � namely that 
Dunsiere
hath attributed his being told to quit to Keatings suggestion, influenced by �Tish�
(whom he sentimentalizeth with,)  and therefore Dunsiere hath sworn to �massacre� him
some night with his policemans bludgeon. (Fagan hath intimated it ^|already| & Keating 
wan-
ted to know �what he�d do in such a case.�)     Get him to buy a revolver, or
apply to a magistrate or something infernally foolish.     Dunsiere roars at the notion,
and agrees to do the mysterious business if he chances on him at night.  (Wrote
to Alf.				               /               
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