Lehigh University
The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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Text for Page 207 [11-07-1887]

              [second page of loose letter]
myself, taken one hot day in June last,
which may partly account for the rather
wilted and used-up look of the sitter,
who never underwent the process with very
satisfactory results.  You will observe that
time has bleached me, considerably: �
�His golden (?) locks time has to silver turned;
	O time too swift!  O swiftness never
	     ceasing!� &c.
But I take the change pretty philosophically, and
considering what old age must inevitably be
to all who attain it, have cause for thank
fulness.  I hope to be able to say �Nunc dimittis�
when my time comes without repining.  There�s
a passage in an old writer, quoted by Charles
Lamb, which I realize very feelingly.  He is
speaking of a man who has lived sixty years
and upwards.  �In such a compass of time,� he
says, �a man may have a close apprehension
what it is to be forgotten, when he hath lived
to find none who could remember his father,
or scarcely the friends of his youth, and may               
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