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Editions >> Atlas >> What is an Atlas?

[1]James R. Akerman, "From Books with Maps to Books as Maps: The Editor in the Creation of the Atlas Idea,"in Editing Early and Historical Atlases: Papers Given at the Twenty-Ninth Annual Conference on Editorial Problems, ed. Joan Winearls (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995): 3-48.

[2]M. Pastoureau, Les Atlas Français, XVIe-XVIIe Siècles: Répertoire Bibliographique et Etude (Paris: Bibliothèque Nationale de France, 1984), iii.

[3]R. W .Karrow, Jr., "Gerard Mercator—Kremer, de Cremere, Gheert Scellekens, Gerardo Rupelimontano,"in Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and Their Maps: Bio-Bibliographies of the Cartographers of Abraham Ortelius, 1570, ed. Karrow, 376-409(Chicago: Speculum Orbis Press, 1983).

[4]Akerman, 19.

[5]David Woodward, "Italian Composite Atlases of the Sixteenth Century,"in Images of the World: The Atlas through History, ed. John A. Wolter and Ronald E. Grim, 51-70 (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1997). Also see Woodward, "The Italian Map Trade, 1480-1773,"in Cartography in the European Renaissance: Part I, Vol. 3 of The History of Cartography, ed. David Woodward, 773-803 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007). For a more detailed discussion of the legends of Atlas, see the entry in William Smith's nineteenth century, 3700 page Dictionary of Greek and Roman Mythology and Biography, which is available online at http://www.ancientlibrary.com/smith-bio/0415.html.

[6]David Woodward, ed., Cartography in the European Renaissance: Part 2, Vol. 3 of The History of Cartography, ed. Woodward (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007), 2066.

[7]Akerman, 4.

[8]C. Koeman, G. Schilder, M. Egmond, and P. van der Krogt, "Commercial Cartography in the Low Countries, 1500-ca. 1672,"in Cartography in the European Renaissance: Part 2, Vol. 3 of The History of Cartography, ed. Woodward, 1296-1383(Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007). Also see M. P. R. van den Broecke, Ortelius Atlas Maps: An Illustrated Guide (‘Goy-Houten, Netherlands: HES Publishers, 1996).

[9]Karrow, 1-31. Abraham Ortelius—Örtel, Ortels, Hortel, Bartolus, Bartholus Arameis.

[10]Akerman, 5.

[11]Karrow, 510-516. Johannes Stumpf—Hanns Stumpff.

[12]G. Grosjean, Mapamundi: The Catalan Atlas of the Year 1375 (Dietikon-Zurich: Urs Graf Verlag, 1978). This is a full color facsimile of the original, held by La Bibliothèque nationale de France. The facsimile was reviewed by T. Campbell, Imago Mundi 33 (1981): 115-116.

[13]H. Wallis, The Maps and Text of the Boke of Idrography Presented by Jean Rotz to Henry VII: Now in the British Library (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981). In addition to a full-color facsimile, there are 93 pages of text (including index) detailing the background of Rotz's atlas.

[14]Patrick Gautier Dalché, "The Reception of Ptolemy's Geography (End of the Fourteenth to Beginning of the Sixteenth Century),"in Cartography in the European Renaissance: Part 1, Vol. 3 of The History of Cartography, ed. Woodward, 285-364 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007). Appendix 9.1 on pp. 361-364 gives an extensive list of all known editions from 1475-1650.

[15]Van den Broecke, 22, plus list of cartographical sources for all the Ortelius atlas maps; Karrow, 1-31 on Ortelius (although the entire book reflects on this subject). See also P. Meurer, Fontes Cartographici Orteliani: Das "Theatrum Orbis Terrarum"von Abraham Ortelius und Seine Kartenquellen (Weinheim: VCH Acta Humaniora, 1991). Muerer's work is reviewed by F. Hebert, Imago Mundi 45 (1993): 151.

[16]Akerman, 29-34.

[17]M. S. Pedley, "‘Commode, Complet, Uniforme, et Suivi': Problems in Atlas Editing in Enlightenment France,"in Editing Early and Historical Atlases: Papers Given at the Twenty-Ninth Annual Conference on Editorial Problems, ed. Joan Winearls, 83-108 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995). The specific remarks concerning the term "editer"are on pp. 83-84.

[18]Pedley, 84.

[19]P. van der Krogt, "Amsterdam Atlas Production in the 1630s: A Bibliographer's Nightmare,"Imago Mundi 48 (1996): 149-160. For a discussion of the concept of "ideal copy,"see F. Bowers, Principles of Bibliographical Description (Newcastle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 1994), 113-123. Bowers allowed himself an escape clause: "When absolutely necessary, an ideal copy may even be a purely hypothetical reconstruction."Still, the concept is problematic for many sixteenth- to eighteenth-century atlases. It is beyond the scope of this discussion to delve into the specific problems associated with cartobibliography.

[20]Pedley, 84.

[21]R. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of The British Library: A Descriptive Catalog c. AD 850-1800 (London: The British Library, 2004), vii. The preface was written by Tony Campbell, former Map Librarian of The British Library.

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