"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Arch. Constable & Co., Publishers.
    [Letter] 1809 February 14, Edinburgh [to] Thomas Allan, Charlotte Square / Arch. Constable [& Co., Publishers]
    Constable states the terms of his agreement with Allan for selling books and providing Allan with a discount "as may reasonably be afforded." Thomas Allan, who developed one of the finest collections of minerals in England, published an Alphabetical list of the names of minerals at present most familiar in the English, French, and German languages (1808), and discovered the mineral Allanite which was named for him.
  2. Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922.
    [Letter] 1876 August 27, Boston University [to] Mrs. A.B. Harris, Warren (New Hampshire) / A[lexander]. Graham Bell.
    Bell thanks Mrs. Harris sending along the very interesting article which he read with much pleasure. He expresses the hope that they will meet soon and apologizes that his pamphlets are out of print; he plans to issue another set and will send them along when they are printed. Known both for his invention of the telephone in 1876 and his teaching of the deaf, Bell taught at Boston University and Oxford, using Visible Speech and a system of notation to teach students with hearing impairments. He also experimented in eugenics, aviation, and telegraphy, interesting himself in the organizations of the National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian Institute. Born in Scotland, Bell became a U.S. citizen in 1882.
  3. Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922.
    [Certificate] 1891 May 8, New York [to] Miss Mary E. Loveless / Alexander Graham Bell.
    Bell signs his name to the certificate of membership, validating that Mary E. Loveless has paid her annual $2 dues and is entitled a full membership to the American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, incorporated in New York in 1890, a society to which Bell donated over $300,000. Known both for his invention of the telephone in 1876 and his teaching of the deaf, Bell taught at Boston University and Oxford, using Visible Speech and a system of notation to teach students with hearing impairments. He also experimented in eugenics, aviation, and telegraphy, interesting himself in the organizations of the National Geographic Society and the Smithsonian Institute. Born in Scotland, Bell became a U.S. citizen in 1882.
  4. Bowditch, Nathaniel, 1773-1838.
    [Letter] 1807 December 24, Salem, Mass., [to] Rev.d J. Morse D.D. / Nathaniel Bowditch.
    Bowditch tells Morse he has not noticed any such variations as are mentioned in the letter, and provides a series of observations from Cambridge. Bowditch was an American mathematical prodigy and astronomer who edited an American edition of J.H. Moore's work on navigation, The New American Practical Navigator (1802). He also translated and annotated the first four volumes of Laplace's Celestial Mechanics (1829-39).
  5. Brande, William Thomas, 1788-1866.
    [Letter] 1819 January 22, Changes Street [to] Thomas Allan / W.T. Brande.
    Brande regrets that he has not heard from Allan recently, telling him that he's busily preparing himself for a winter at the Royal Institution while working on his Manual of Chemistry "which I hope will meet with your approbation." He characterizes Edinburgh as "particularly barren in scientific intelligence" since the invention of the kaleidescope which is now out. Stating that he has given up collecting himself, having found other ways to dispose of "loose cash," Brande also mentions a mutual friend's plan to sell his mineralogical collection. Brande reveals that Brewster is setting up an opposition journal in spite of the offers Murray made to join the journal Brande is concerned with; Brande expresses that he hopes Allan will not "desert" them and will contribute an article. Closing by asking for "geological news," Brande asks Allan to find out if Napier has received his letter. Thomas Allan, who developed one of the finest collections of minerals in England, published an Alphabetical list of the names of minerals at present most familiar in the English, French, and German languages (1808), and discovered the mineral Allanite which was named for him. His son, banker Robert Allan, continued his work in mineralogy.
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