"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
    [Letter] 1797 July 5, New York [to] James Monroe / Alexander Hamilton.
    Hamilton writes regarding the publication of a pamphlet referencing the Reynolds affair, characterizing the attacks on Monroe (by Hamilton?) as ungrateful in light of his leniency. The papers state that Hamilton entreated Monroe and others not to tell Washington which they agreed to do in exchange for a promise of future good behavior on Hamilton's part; the papers also contend that Hamilton made a voluntary acknowledgement of seduction (of Mrs. Reynolds, probably). Hamilton requests Monroe's "contradiction of the Representations" in these papers with the delicacy that "one Gentleman has a right to expect from another." He also notes that there must have been some "dishonourable infidelity" to allow the story to get out. Hamilton also encloses a memorandum he made (also in the collection) of Monroe's opinion after their initial interview on the subject. This is one of a series of letters in the collection referring to Hamilton's involvement in the "Reynolds scandal." In 1797 accusations were brought against Hamilton by James Monroe and others, alleging that Hamilton had bribed James Reynolds to cover up financial misconduct during his tenure as Secretary of the Treasury; to preserve the honor of the financial system, Hamilton confessed that the blackmail payments resulted from an affair with Reynolds' wife, Maria. Born in the British West Indies, Hamilton was effectively orphaned at age 11, and emigrated to America where he served with Washington during the Revolution. After the war he attended the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, publishing the Federalist papers in installments in 1787, and becoming Washington's Secretary of the Treasury (1789-1795). Hamilton's public opposition to Aaron Burr's gubernatorial candidacy in New York resulted in a challenge from Burr, and in the ensuing duel Hamilton was fatally wounded. The recipient of the letter, James Monroe would become the fifth President of the United States; he also served in the Revolution, as a Senator from Virginia (1790-94), as a member of the Continental Congress (1783-86), as Minister to France under Washington (1894-96) and Jefferson (1803, also England 1803-07), as Madison's Secretary of State (1811-17), and as Secretary of War (1814-15). Frederick Muhlenberg was a preacher and politician, member of the Continental Congress (1779-80) and the House of Representatives (1789-1797) where he was the Speaker of the House for the first and third Congresses.
  2. Hay, John, 1838-1905.
    [Letter] 1901 March 16, Washington [to] Henry Ketcham, Westfield, NJ / John Hay.
    Hay states that he "cannot agree with Mr. Lamon in his estimate of the reception of the Gettysburg speech." Instead, he recalls that it was "immediately received with the same expressions of approval and admiration that we have been accustomed to ever since." Ketcham may have written to Hay regarding research for his book Life of Abraham Lincoln (1901) which appeared the year he received this reply from Hay.
  3. Ickes, Harold L. (Harold LeClair), 1874-1952.
    [Letter] [date stamped 1940 August 12], Washington [to] Francis E. Walter, House of Representatives / Harold Ickes.
    Ickes tells Walter that he has recently discussed with First Assistant Secretary Burlew the case involving Harold Miller, Superintendent of the CCC Project in which Walter has taken an interest. Ickes reveals that he has reviewed the case and regretfully determined that Miller is in violation of the Hatch Act for soliciting funds for political purposes from employees. For this reason he will be dismissed and "In view of your special interest in Mr. Miller, I am sorry that this action is necessary." Ickes closes by stating that he will also open an investigation into "the alleged political activity" of Senior Foreman Baker that Walter mentioned to Mr. Burlew. A social activist and a municipal reformer, Ickes served as Secretary of the Interior under Franklin Delano Roosevelt, partnering across party lines to facilitate the growth of FDR's New Deal policies, to oppose graft and corruption, and to protect natural resources. Ickes headed up the Public Works Administration 1933-1939; he resigned from politics in 1946 after a dispute with President Truman.
  4. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 8, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    Irving reminds Kemble of the letter he had written previously "in a moment of vexation" on the subject of Mr. Johasen [Jeronimus Johasen?] who had promised to aid Irving's brother in obtaining an office, and then set out to obtain it for himself. Irving calls this behavior "trickery," and encloses a letter from a different sort of man, Mr. Benjamin F. Butler, for Van Buren. Irving states that he is sorry to trouble Kemble in the matter but his domestic comfort and the welfare of his family are now too much involved. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  5. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 24, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    In compliance with Kemble's suggestion, Irving has approached the leaders of the party to interest them in his brother's case. Irving characterizes this solicitation as "irksome," and cites only his concern for the welfare of his brother's family as his motivation; they are a numerous group with diminishing means. Irving lists the steps he has taken on his brother's behalf as well as the people he has spoken to including, in a postscript Mr. [Jeronimus Johasen?]. He regrets that he cannot come to Washington until the matter is settled. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
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