"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] 1846 January 6, Cooperstown [to] Editors, Albany / J[ames] Fenimore Cooper.
    Cooper writes to the editors of Cultivator regarding "potatoe-cholera." He traces the presence of the disease in this country's crop between 1843 and 1845, and relates an anecdote about Lancashire potatoes he sent for from England to plant on his own grounds which were soon infested with the disease; he states that he fed these to the hogs with "perfect impunity." Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  2. Copley, Godfrey, Sir, d. 1709.
    [Letter] 1702/3 March 4, [to] Thomas Kirk, Esq., Yorkshire / G. Copley.
    Copley declares, "Your old Philosopher is gone at last to try experiments with ancestors," having died without a will and in the company of a "Girle" who could not get him help in time. "Thus departed the great Dr. Hook." An additional note indicates that there will be a great promotion of new peers, but that it probably won't affect them much. An English philanthropist (who would himself die in 1709), Copley endowed the fund used since 1736 to award the Copley medal to the best work on experimental philosophy.
  3. Curie, Marie, 1867-1934.
    [Letter] 1922 May 25, Paris (France) [to] Mrs. Tyson / M. Curie [Marie Curie].
    Curie briefly states that she cannot ask Mrs. Tyson to visit as her daughter has been ill, but they would love to have Mrs. Tyson visit after her return from Limoges. The first person to receive two Nobel Prizes (1903, 1911), Curie worked to isolate two new elements, polonium and radium, in 1898 in collaboration with her husband, physicist Pierre Curie. She pioneered work on the medical applications of x rays and introduced the concept of radioactivity to the world. After her husband's death in 1906, she was invited to take over his teaching position at the University of Paris, the first woman in France to hold such a post. In 1921 she made a highly publicized tour of the United States, honored by women's organizations and the White House.
  4. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882.
    [Letter] 1877 March 7, Kent [to] Messrs. Smith & Elder, London / Charles Darwin.
    Darwin states that Balliere would like to do a French translation of his Coral Reefs which he would be glad to see. He inquires as to the cost of stereotypes of the woodcuts and 500 copies of the maps already colored. Since Balliere's decision to publish the book will be driven by the expense, Darwin hopes that "you will not charge much more than the cost price." In a postscript he considers whether the maps will do after all, since they have English names. The work Darwin is referencing here is his The structure and distribution of coral reefs; being the first part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle, under the command of Capt. Fitzroy, R.N. during the years 1832 to 1836 (1842), the first work in a trilogy focused on the geology of South America. Darwin's speculations about evolution and natural selection in his Origin of the Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) were published and widely discussed during his lifetime.
  5. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882.
    [Letter] 1875 October 30, Kent [to] Smith & Elder / Charles Darwin.
    Darwin thanks the recipient for funds and discusses the second edition of Coral Reefs the publication of which he had feared "might cause you actual loss." The work Darwin is referencing here is his The structure and distribution of coral reefs; being the first part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle, under the command of Capt. Fitzroy, R.N. during the years 1832 to 1836 (1842), the first work in a trilogy focused on the geology of South America. Darwin's speculations about evolution and natural selection in his Origin of the Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) were published and widely discussed during his lifetime.
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