"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Drinker, Henry S. (Henry Sturgis), 1850-1937.
    [Letter] [1913] December 23, Bethlehem, PA [to] Woodrow Wilson, Washington DC / Henry S. Drinker.
    Drinker acknowledges Wilson's response to his December 20th letter in which he approved of the President's endorsement of the Hetch Hetchy Valley dam project. The bill relates to the movement of San Francisco to secure the scenic Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park as a site for city reservoir; naturalists like John Muir opposed the plan, but Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913 which allowed for the still-controversial dam to be built. An 1871 Lehigh graduate, Drinker remains the only alumnus to become president; he presided over the University from 1905 to 1920, establishing the endowment, an alumni bulletin, and a business model for running the University. During his tenure seven buildings were completed on campus, and majors were divided into three separate colleges. At the time this letter was written, Wilson was serving his first term in office during which he passed anti-trust legislation and labor reform bills; during his second term the United States entered World War II on the side of the Allies. Wilson's hand-crafted League of Nations was not accepted by Congress, but many of its elements would be restored in the formation of the United Nations.
  2. Drinker, Henry S. (Henry Sturgis), 1850-1937.
    [Letter] [19]26 June 26, Merion Station, Pennsylvania [to] Mr. Leach / Henry S. Drinker.
    Drinker writes to Leach, the Lehigh librarian, regarding the missing letter from President Wilson which he states he is sending for the library's collection. Drinker may be referring to the letter Wilson wrote to him in 1913 (see the collection) about the Hetch Hetchy Valley dam project. Drinker also requests the return of another Wilson-related letter. An 1871 Lehigh graduate, Drinker remains the only alumnus to become president; he presided over the University from 1905 to 1920, establishing the endowment, an alumni bulletin, and a business model for running the University. During his tenure seven buildings were completed on campus, and majors were divided into three separate colleges. At the time this letter was written, Wilson was serving his first term in office during which he passed anti-trust legislation and labor reform bills; during his second term the United States entered World War II on the side of the Allies. Wilson's hand-crafted League of Nations was not accepted by Congress, but many of its elements would be restored in the formation of the United Nations.
  3. Drinker, Henry S. (Henry Sturgis), 1850-1937.
    [Letter] [19]14 January 4, South Bethlehem, PA [to] Garman / Henry S. Drinker.
    Drinker greets Garman as a fellow-worker for the promotion of wrestling and "all good manly things" at Lehigh. He thanks him for his Christmas card, and observes that "All seems to be going well with Lehigh." An 1871 Lehigh graduate, Drinker remains the only alumnus to become president; he presided over the University from 1905 to 1920, establishing the endowment, an alumni bulletin, and a business model for running the University. During his tenure seven buildings were completed on campus, and majors were divided into three separate colleges.
  4. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.
    [Letter] 1953 May 13, The White House, Washington [to] President M.D. Whitaker, Bethlehem, Pa. / Dwight D. Eisenhower.
    Eisenhower thanks Whitaker for his letter regarding the conferring of an honorary degree upon Dr. A. V. Astin, Director of the National Bureau of Standards; Eisenhower assures Whitaker that this action will not be misconstrued. The decision to honor him "confirms his high standing in the scientific world." Eisenhower also mentions the Secretary of Commerce's public approbation of Astin as well as an ad hoc inquiry at the Bureau. A lifelong military man, Eisenhower made his reputation as the Supreme Commander of troops invading France on D-Day, 1944 at the end of World War II. Postwar, he accepted an appointment as President of Columbia University, and then moved on to assume command over NATO forces assembled in 1951. In 1952 he ran for President, an office which he held for two terms (1953-61). During his Presidency he negotiated the dangers of nuclear proliferation during the Cold War. He retired in 1961 to his farm in Gettysburg. Before becoming President of Lehigh University, Whitaker directed the Atomic Energy Commission Laboratory in Tennessee and helped to develop the atomic bomb. At Lehigh, he facilitated the University's postwar growth, tripling its assets, doubling its endowment, renovating buildings, and increasing professorships by 75 percent.
  5. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.
    [Letter] 1956 October 10, White House, Washington, D.C. [to] James D. Mack, Bethlehem, Pa. / Dwight D. Eisenhower.
    Eisenhower thanks Mack for sending the handbill of the dedication of Gettysburg National Cemetery in 1863. He and his wife are "delighted to have one of these rare leaflets." He asks Mack to accept his thanks and convey them to his colleagues at Lehigh Library as well. A lifelong military man, Eisenhower made his reputation as the Supreme Commander of troops invading France on D-Day, 1944 at the end of World War II. Postwar, he accepted an appointment as President of Columbia University, and then moved on to assume command over NATO forces assembled in 1951. In 1952 he ran for President, an office which he held for two terms (1953-61). During his Presidency he negotiated the dangers of nuclear proliferation during the Cold War. He retired in 1961 to his farm in Gettysburg.
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