"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
Browse >> Science

21-25 of 108 Items.

  1. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882.
    [Letter] [1876] Aug. 21, Kent (England), [to] Smith, Elder, and Co. / Ch. Darwin [Charles Darwin].
    Writing to the publishers of The Structure and distribution of coral reefs, Darwin states that the maps do excellently, but also stipulates that thinner, tougher paper should be employed for the long map of the coral reefs, since his copy is already separating along the lines of the folding. Naturalist Charles Darwin's speculations about evolution and natural selection in his Origin of the Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) were published and widely discussed during his lifetime.
  2. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882.
    [Manuscript] Chapter VIII "Hybridity" [from] Origin of the Species [c.1859] / [Charles Darwin].
    This is a manuscript of the first page of Darwin's Chapter VIII on Hybridity from the first edition of Origin of the Species (1859). See also the accompanying printed version identifying the changes Darwin made to the original text. A letter from his daughter and a letter from the seller accompany the manuscript leaf. Naturalist Charles Darwin's speculations about evolution and natural selection in his Origin of the Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) were published and widely discussed during his lifetime.
  3. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882.
    [Manuscript] Chapter VI [from] Origin of the Species / [Charles Darwin].
    This manuscript leaf is from Chapter VI of Darwin's Origin of the Species (1859) in which he discourses on transitional habits and the difficulties on theory. Naturalist Charles Darwin's speculations about evolution and natural selection in his Origin of the Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) were published and widely discussed during his lifetime.
  4. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] 1805 October 29, [London], [to] Dear Sir / H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy regrets that he was not able to meet the recipient in Ireland, and thanks him for "taking the trouble to transmit my letters." Davy states that his journey into the North has furnished him with ample material to research in his winter leisure; he declares himself especially interested in the formation of basaltic rock. Davy thanks the recipient particularly for introducing him to Dr. Richardson whose work he has found useful. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
  5. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] 1823 January 11, [to] Dear Sir / H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy writes of the anticipated pleasure of seeing the recipient and Mr. Gilbert on the 18th, a day another friend has chosen. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
  6. powered by CONTENTdm

1-5  6-10  11-15  16-20  21-25  >

Lehigh University Digital Library

Conditions of Use