"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] 1823 January 11, [to] Dear Sir / H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy writes of the anticipated pleasure of seeing the recipient and Mr. Gilbert on the 18th, a day another friend has chosen. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
  2. Davy, John, 1790-1868.
    [Letter] 1858 March 9, [to] Robert Allan / J.Davy.
    Davy states that among the letters from his brother to Allan's father which Allan allowed him to review several years ago, there was one dated October 6, 1811 which made a mention of Davy in the last paragraph. Though he copied it out, he omitted the final paragraph, and would appreciate it if Allan would mind transcribing it for him. Davy asks who is the possessor of Allan's father's collection of minerals, and mentions that he is preparing some of his brother's work for publication and might mention the Allan connection. After his brother's death, John published Fragmentary remains, literary and scientific, of Sir Humphry, Davy, bart., late president of the Royal society, etc., with a sketch of his life and selections from his correspondence. Ed. by his brother, John Davy.... One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners. Robert Allan was a banker who also pursued mineralogy in the tradition of his father Thomas Allan, whom he accompanied on geological excursions. Robert's Manual of Mineralogy (1834) contains illustrations taken from his own drawings of crystals.
  3. Dwight, Theodore, 1796-1866.
    [Letter] 1842 September 18, Brooklyn [to] William Bliss, New York / Theodore Dwight Jr.
    Dwight thanks Bliss for his note of the 27th; he has spoken to Mr. Wiley on the subject, "offering to do all in power for his satisfaction." Dwight's father (of the same name) was secretary of the Hartford convention, and the boy was raised on the doctrine of Federalism. He spoke many languages and was well traveled, writing several travelogues about his journeys. He completed translations and produced pieces for a number of magazines and newspapers including his own Dwight's American Magazine and Family Newspaper (1845-1852). Dwight was involved with educational reform, introduced music into New York schools, was a part of the Free Soil emigration movement to Kansas, and befriended General Garibaldi whose autobiography he helped to publish.
  4. Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867.
    [Letter] 18[47?] March 22, Royal Institution [to] Dr. Henry / M[ichael]. Faraday.
    Faraday declares that Henry must not know his rule: "I never dine out & go to [...?] parties very rarely," citing his busy schedule as well as his health as reasons, and stating that he cannot break this rule without giving "just offense" to many kind persons. He expresses regret that he must "lose the pleasure of your company." A philosopher as well as a scientist, Faraday experimented with electricity, chemistry, radiation, and physics. Sir Humphrey Davy, whose influence secured Faraday his first position as a laboratory assistant at the Royal Institution, was his mentor, and his contemporary John Tyndall (whose work, along with Davy's, is also represented in the collection) wrote Faraday's biography in 1872. Faraday became director of the laboratory in the Royal Institution in 1825 where he devised a lecture series, taught chemistry at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, became a fellow of the Royal Society as well as a scientific adviser to the Corporation of Trinity House, and his portrait appears on the Bank of England's twenty-pound note.
  5. Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867.
    [Letter] 1853 June 23 [to] [London Times] / M[ichael] Faraday.
    Faraday writes regarding the spiritualist phenomenon of table-turning occuring during seances in which Victorian believers sought to communicate with their dead. Faraday declares himself "greatly startled by the revelation which this purely physical subject has made of the condition of the public mind." Mesmerists saw Faraday's discovery of diamagnetism as an important breakthrough, and when table-turning and spiritualism became popular in the early 1850s, Faraday wrote this letter to the Times (published June 30) to discredit the phenomenon and expalin it in scientific, rather than spiritual, terms. He published a longer letter in the Athenaeum the following week (July 2). In the wake of angry letters from table turners, Faraday and Henry Bence Jones organized a lecture series following up on the points Faraday made in his article; Prince Albert attended two of these lectures. A philosopher as well as a scientist, Faraday experimented with electricity, chemistry, radiation, and physics. Sir Humphrey Davy, whose influence secured Faraday his first position as a laboratory assistant at the Royal Institution, was his mentor, and his contemporary John Tyndall (whose work, along with Davy's, is also represented in the collection) wrote Faraday's biography in 1872. Faraday became director of the laboratory in the Royal Institution in 1825 where he devised a lecture series, taught chemistry at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, became a fellow of the Royal Society as well as a scientific adviser to the Corporation of Trinity House, and his portrait appears on the Bank of England's twenty-pound note.
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