"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Thomson, Andrew, 1779-1831--Correspondence.
    [Letter] 1827 August 14, 29 Melville Street [to] / Andrew Thomson.
    Thomson states that he has just read the Editor's note to Scotincanus and the article to which it refers, and he would like to extend his "entire satisfaction with your conduct as an Editor on this occasion." Thompson praises the Editor's judgement and delicacy in regards to the participants of the dispute, and he states that he is enclosing his friend's letter of reply to that subject for inclusion in the Mercury. Despite his friend's earlier anger at having his work edited, Thompson grants permission to the Editor to exercise his talents on the letter and to excise any objectionable material. He urges the Editor to publish the letter so that the things which are "unanswered and untouched" may be dealt with publicly, and he mentions the matter of Bible circulation. He further offers to exchange the name and address of his friend in return for the name and address of "Anglicanus."
  2. Tyler, John, 1790-1862.
    [Letter] 1843 April 1, Washington [to] Mr. Spencer / John Tyler.
    Tyler writes to Spencer, expressing his "regret and surpize" [sic] in the wake of accusations against Mr. Holmes, a clerk in the Land Office; Tyler had forwarded papers regarding this affair to Spencer, requesting an investigation. Disapproving of the response to this request, Tyler states, "That we may understand each other thoroughly I must say, that I will deny to myself no avenue of information as to the course of those in office under me." In addition to serving as Vice President under Harrison, Tyler also served in the House and the Senate and as Governor of Virginia; he is remembered for his strict adherence to the Constitution, and for being the first Vice-President to take over the office of President upon the death of the holder of that office. Tyler was elected to the Confederate Congress, but died before he could assume that office in 1862. Cabinet Member under Tyler. Served as Secretary of War (1841-1843) and the Secretary of the Treasury (1843-1844). (He was the Secretary of the Treasury at the time of this letter.) Prior to this, he served in the War of 1812 and was a U.S. Representative from New York. More information can be found at the Biographic Directory of the United States Congress website (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scrips/biodisplay.p.?index=S000727 )
  3. Von Buch, Leopold, Freiherr, 1774-1853.
    [Letter] 1816 August 20, Glasgow [to] Thomas Allan, Edinburgh/ Leopold von Buch.
    Von Buch writes to Allan to thank him for his hospitality during his visit. Though he enjoyed viewing Allan's cabinet of specimens, Von Buch expresses dismay over the papers Allan gave him which attack Von Buch's mentor Werner. Von Buch states that his own views "are to study nature so not to offend any party." He goes on to contrast the views of Werner with Hutton, and he asserts that Werner's students are dispersed all over the world. Closing the letter, Von Buch maintains that he will continue to read Allan's work, and that a moment of "excited passion will never diminsh the respect" he feels for his work. Von Buch studied under Abraham G. Werner, noted geologist, at the Freiberg School of Mining from 1790-1793. He pursued geology afterwards, his investigations leading him from the Alps to the Canary Islands to the Hebrides to the coasts of Ireland and Scotland. His research ultimately lead him to refute many of Werner's theories about "Neptunism," resulting to his conversion to a belief in volcanism which holds that rocks form through volcanic action. Thomas Allan (1777-1833), an Edinburgh born mineralogist, was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1805 and the Royal Society of London in 1815. He was also a banker and a newspaper proprietor.
  4. Watt, [James, 1769-1848].
    [Letter] 1807 March 10, Soho [to] Thos. Woodruffe Smith, London / [James] Watt & Boulton.
    In the letter, Watt states that the Smith's account has not been settled, and he mentions the possibility of bringing legal action. James Watt (1736-1819) and Matthew Boulton (1728-1809) established a steam engine partnership in 1775. By 1796 the partners had opened the Soho Foundry. Their respective sons (James Watt, junior, 1769-1848, and Matthew Robinson Boulton, 1770-1842) joined the business and eventually took over. Their company was called Boulton, Watt & Sons from 1795-1800; after the formal retirement of Watt, it is referred to as Boulton, Watt & Co. They manufactured steam engines domestically as well as overseas; the cutting-edge techniques were subject to industrial espionage, and much of James Watt, junior's time was occupied in patent protection and in catching pirates who sought to copy his father's innovations. Archives of their materials, drawings, and correspondences are available at the Birmingham Central Library which houses the Boulton and Watt Archive and the Matthew Boulton papers (http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/GenerateContent?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1604&CONTENT_ITEM_TYPE=0&MENU_ID=10468).
  5. Watt, James, 1769-1848.
    [Letter] 1821 January 27, London [to] Thomas Allan, Edinburgh / James Watt.
    Watt writes to Allan to express that he is glad of his involvement with the London & Edinboro Steam Packets. Watt mentions Mr. McBrair and Mr. David Milne, and recommends Mr. Thomas Hamilton as an agent at New Haven since he has a preponderance of the Scottish business. Watt also calculates the expenses of a voyage for a ship between Edinboro and Glasgow, including the price of the engineer and an estimate of coal costs. James Watt (1736-1819) and Matthew Boulton (1728-1809) established a steam engine partnership in 1775. By 1796 the partners had opened the Soho Foundry. Their respective sons (James Watt, junior, 1769-1848, and Matthew Robinson Boulton, 1770-1842) joined the business and eventually took over. Their company was called Boulton, Watt & Sons from 1795-1800; after the formal retirement of Watt, it is referred to as Boulton, Watt & Co. They manufactured steam engines domestically as well as overseas. The cutting-edge techniques were subject to industrial espionage, and much of James Watt, junior's time was occupied in patent protection and in catching pirates who sought to copy his father's innovations. Archives of their materials, drawings, and correspondences are available at the Birmingham Central Library which houses the Boulton and Watt Archive and the Matthew Boulton papers (http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/GenerateContent?CONTENT_ITEM_ID=1604&CONTENT_ITEM_TYPE=0&MENU_ID=10468).
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