"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] [1824] April 10, Portsmouth [to] Thomas Allan, Edinburgh/ H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy describes an experiment he conducted in London "nearly 20 months ago" involving black spots which contained acid; he is currently working on experiments with the preservation of copper which he has proved "beyond the possibility of doubt." He also mentions that his brother (John Davy) is in town and in good health. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
  2. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] 1802, [to] J. Tobin, Bristol / H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy explains that Mr. Hutchinson has put off their departure until tomorrow; they will stop at Buxton, where he will call on Dr. Forrester, and at Matlock. Davy hopes that Tobin will meet him at either spot for fishing, and he asks Tobin to write to Coleridge who lives not far from Buxton and might join them. Davy mentions that Lord Stanhope has left town, and he discusses the controversy surrounding the experiments of Dr. Herchell. He closes with a plea that the "King of Hearts" will make an excursion to "meet us his old friends somewhere amidst the northern wilds" and adjures him to give up philosophy, experimenting, love, and money to spend a few days among the beauties of nature. Tobin was an old friend of Davy's; his son James accompanied Davy on the last journey of his life and was with him when he died. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
  3. Davy, John, 1790-1868.
    [Letter] 1858 March 9, [to] Robert Allan / J.Davy.
    Davy states that among the letters from his brother to Allan's father which Allan allowed him to review several years ago, there was one dated October 6, 1811 which made a mention of Davy in the last paragraph. Though he copied it out, he omitted the final paragraph, and would appreciate it if Allan would mind transcribing it for him. Davy asks who is the possessor of Allan's father's collection of minerals, and mentions that he is preparing some of his brother's work for publication and might mention the Allan connection. After his brother's death, John published Fragmentary remains, literary and scientific, of Sir Humphry, Davy, bart., late president of the Royal society, etc., with a sketch of his life and selections from his correspondence. Ed. by his brother, John Davy.... One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners. Robert Allan was a banker who also pursued mineralogy in the tradition of his father Thomas Allan, whom he accompanied on geological excursions. Robert's Manual of Mineralogy (1834) contains illustrations taken from his own drawings of crystals.
  4. Denham, Dixon, 1786-1828; Phillips, T.
    [Letter] [n.d.] Albany [to] T. Phillips Esq., 8 George St. / Denham Dixon.
    Dixon apologizes for "absolutely forgetting my appointment" to meet Phillips, explaining that he was "at the British Museum all day about my Birds and Quadrupeds." He requests to know when he might come again.
  5. Diesel, Rudolf, 1858-1913.
    [Letter] New York [to] Mr. Hall/ Mr. [Rudolf] Diesel.
    Diesel thanks Hall for sending him the pass, but states that he will not be able to use it as his time in New York is now ended. Diesel was a mechanical engineer who invented the compression-ignition internal combustion engine which is named after him. The engine, which Diesel described in his 1893 paper "The Theory and Design of a Rational Heat Engine," was displayed at the 1898 Munich Exhibition; the United States license sold for $1 million.
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