"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Collins, Wilkie, 1824-1889.
    [Manuscript] [pre 1874 October] "Fatal Fortune: A True Story" / Wilkie Collins [William Wilkie Collins].
    Collins' manuscript is a short story told from the perspective of a woman who falls in love with a man suspected of being "mad." He has been subsequently disenfranchised of his fortune by scheming executors. An English novelist who wrote sensation fiction, Wilkie Collins' most popular works include The Woman in White (1860) and The Moonstone (1868); a friend of Charles Dickens' (whose letters are also represented in the collection), Collins collaborated with him on No Thoroughfare (1867) and contributed to Dickens' periodical Household Words.
  2. Collins, Wilkie, 1824-1889.
    [Letter] 1879 March 15, London [to] Mr. E.A. Buck / Wilkie Collins.
    Collins reports that the necessities of advertising have obliged him to publish a date for the Christmas story, reminding Buck that if it is not published in England, Collins loses his copyright. Collins makes plans to send the manuscript and calculates the date of its arrival. He also mentions the story "The Devil's Spectacles," asserting that the Devil "shall have no cause to be ashamed of the story if I [underscored] can help it." An English novelist who wrote sensation fiction, Wilkie Collins' most popular works include The Woman in White (1860) and The Moonstone (1868); a friend of Charles Dickens' (whose letters are also represented in the collection), Collins collaborated with him on No Thoroughfare (1867) and contributed to Dickens' periodical Household Words.
  3. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Contract] for the right to reprint Naval Biographies/ J[ames]. Fenimore Cooper, Esquire.
    Cooper signs away the right to reprint the "fifteen numbers of Naval Biographer" for $500 as well as four number to be written; a list of the subjects appears with numbers beside them. The contract may be referencing Cooper's Lives of Distinguished American Naval Officers (1846) which expanded on literary territory explored in his The History of the Navy of the United States of America (1839). Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  4. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] [c. 1826-1833] [to] Madame le Duchess de Broglie / [James Fenimore Cooper].
    Cooper sends his respect to Broglie as well as his manuscript on those countries which they discussed last evening; he does not expect her to read the whole thing, but to dip into it here and there for what may prove amusing. He specifically points her to passages dealing with the prairies and their inhabitants, including a visit to the Pawnee and a noble Indian chief "who would have been a hero in any civilized nation." Cooper had relocated with his family in 1826 to serve as US Consul at Lyons, France; though his diplomatic position lapsed, he remained abroad, traveling and writing, until 1833. Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  5. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] 1832 July 15, Paris [to] Mr. River / J[ames]. Fenimore Cooper.
    On the eve of his departure for the Rhine and Switzerland, Cooper states that he is "setting my house in order" as their return is uncertain; therefore, he is returning two books he borrowed, with apologies for holding them so long. He states that Mrs. Cooper is unwell, and wishes the Rivers a pleasant passage home, should they sail before Cooper's return. Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
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