"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Fulton, Robert, 1765-1815.
    [Letter] 1815 January 28, Trenton [to] Nathaniel Cutting / Robert Fulton.
    Fulton charges Cutting with writing a letter which was read before the Trenton House of Assembly, a letter which was "false and malignant evidently done and with great exactness and care to injure me and gratify Thornton Fairfax and other of my ignorant enemies; you state positively that I pirated Mr. Cartwright's rope machine and sold it to you as wholly my own, this is untrue." Fulton points out that he introduced Cutting to Cartwright, and reconstructed the machine from memory, making alterations, and keeping with the patent laws of France. Fulton also states that he has Fitch's papers demonstrating that Fitch "had not one exact scientific idea about a Steamboat." Fulton counters, "_I accept the war [underlined]. I defy you or any living being to stain my character with one unfair, ungenerous or illiberal act, towards my Friends, or of assuming to myself in any way what is not my own and I will not lose an instant, in making you answerable for a libel on my character as a man of honor [underlined]." He observes that "Thornton has published your calumny in a pamphlet, and each of you shall make atonements."
  2. Gosse, Edmund, 1849-1928.
    [Letter] [18]84 April 4 [to] Mr. Carey / Edmund Gosse.
    Gosse writes to Carey to alert him that Miss Helen Zimmson is in Italy and will not be available to correct the proofs; as a result, it contains "serious errors" and Gosse has "taken upon myself to read it very carefully," to correct the errors, and transmit it back to Carey. Gosse also mentions that Zimmson was pained because her name did not appear with a previous article she wrote; he asks Carey to "kindly see that she has credit given her for her present article in the magazine." A literary historian, translator, and critic, Gosse worked in the library at the British Museum (1865-1875), translated Ibsen, edited Swinburne's letters, wrote about his travels in America, lectured on English literature at Trinity College, Cambridge (1885-1890), and was the librarian to the House of Lords (1904-1914).
  3. Grey, Henry.
    [Letter] [to] Editor of the California Mercury / Henry Grey.
    Grey thanks the Editor of the California Mercury for inserting his friend's communication; he has made the suggestions expunging of the marked passages and hopes that the article is now unexceptionable. Grey prefers to keep his name out of the business as "it is not desireable to be made the object of these personal attacks to which the gentlemen on the other side are so much addicted." He hopes the letter will appear in tomorrow's paper and requests a dozen copies.
  4. Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
    [Letter] 1797 July 17, Philadelphia [to] Fred. A Muhlenberg & James Monroe / Alexander Hamilton.
    Hamilton is glad that his explanation proved satisfactory and goes on to explain the remarks which appeared in the Gazette. He clarifies that the hostile "party spirit" he refers to was shown not by Monroe, but by Reynolds and Clingman, who took advantage of this spirit to make insinuations against Hamilton while they were being prosecuted for other offenses. Hamilton declares himself "satisfied with and sensible to the candour with which I had been treated" by Monroe and Muhlenberg. This is one of a series of letters in the collection referring to Hamilton's involvement in the "Reynolds scandal." In 1797 accusations were brought against Hamilton by James Monroe and others, alleging that Hamilton had bribed James Reynolds to cover up financial misconduct during his tenure as Secretary of the Treasury; to preserve the honor of the financial system, Hamilton confessed that the blackmail payments resulted from an affair with Reynolds' wife, Maria. Born in the British West Indies, Hamilton was effectively orphaned at age 11, and emigrated to America where he served with Washington during the Revolution. After the war he attended the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, publishing the Federalist papers in installments in 1787, and becoming Washington's Secretary of the Treasury (1789-1795). Hamilton's public opposition to Aaron Burr's gubernatorial candidacy in New York resulted in a challenge from Burr, and in the ensuing duel Hamilton was fatally wounded. The recipient of the letter, James Monroe would become the fifth President of the United States; he also served in the Revolution, as a Senator from Virginia (1790-94), as a member of the Continental Congress (1783-86), as Minister to France under Washington (1894-96) and Jefferson (1803, also England 1803-07), as Madison's Secretary of State (1811-17), and as Secretary of War (1814-15). Frederick Muhlenberg was a preacher and politician, member of the Continental Congress (1779-80) and the House of Representatives (1789-1797) where he was the Speaker of the House for the first and third Congresses.
  5. Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804.
    [Memorandum] 1797 regarding the statements of Mr. Muhlenberg & Mr. Monroe regarding the James Reynolds affair / [Alexander Hamilton].
    Hamilton notes that Muhlenberg and Monroe expressed satisfaction at his explanations and regretted the trouble they had occasioned for Hamilton. They stated that there was "nothing in the transaction which ought to affect my character as a Public Officer or lessen the Public Confidence in my Integrity." This is one of a series of letters in the collection referring to Hamilton's involvement in the "Reynolds scandal." In 1797 accusations were brought against Hamilton by James Monroe and others, alleging that Hamilton had bribed James Reynolds to cover up financial misconduct during his tenure as Secretary of the Treasury; to preserve the honor of the financial system, Hamilton confessed that the blackmail payments resulted from an affair with Reynolds' wife, Maria. Born in the British West Indies, Hamilton was effectively orphaned at age 11, and emigrated to America where he served with Washington during the Revolution. After the war he attended the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, publishing the Federalist papers in installments in 1787, and becoming Washington's Secretary of the Treasury (1789-1795). Hamilton's public opposition to Aaron Burr's gubernatorial candidacy in New York resulted in a challenge from Burr, and in the ensuing duel Hamilton was fatally wounded. The recipient of the letter, James Monroe would become the fifth President of the United States; he also served in the Revolution, as a Senator from Virginia (1790-94), as a member of the Continental Congress (1783-86), as Minister to France under Washington (1894-96) and Jefferson (1803, also England 1803-07), as Madison's Secretary of State (1811-17), and as Secretary of War (1814-15). Frederick Muhlenberg was a preacher and politician, member of the Continental Congress (1779-80) and the House of Representatives (1789-1797) where he was the Speaker of the House for the first and third Congresses.
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