"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Clinton, DeWitt, 1769-1828.
    [Letter] 1826 May 23, New York [for] James Fenimore Cooper / Dewitt Clinton.
    Clinton writes a formal letter recommending Cooper as a citizen of the United States of "respectable character" and "distinguished talents" to all whom he may meet. At the time, Cooper was preparing to serve as a Consul to Lyons, France. Clinton served as Governor of the state of NY from 1817-1821 and 1825-1828, during which time he founded the New York Historical Society and the Academy of Fine Arts; prior to holding this office, he also filled a Senate vacancy (1802-1803) and served several terms as mayor of New York City. Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  2. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] 1832 July 15, Paris [to] Mr. River / J[ames]. Fenimore Cooper.
    On the eve of his departure for the Rhine and Switzerland, Cooper states that he is "setting my house in order" as their return is uncertain; therefore, he is returning two books he borrowed, with apologies for holding them so long. He states that Mrs. Cooper is unwell, and wishes the Rivers a pleasant passage home, should they sail before Cooper's return. Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  3. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] 1828 March 11, London [to] Cary, Lea, & Cary, Philadelphia / J[ames]. Fenimore Cooper.
    Cooper discusses the publication of his Letters [probably his Letter of J. Fenimore Cooper to General Lafayette (1831) which touts that republics are more economical than monarchies] which he feels have a higher mercantile value than the $1500 being offered, but since the recipients think so much of "the poor Prairie" then he will let them have it. He mentions trouble with critics and goes on to evaluate Red Rover (1828), stating that in terms of "character and dramatic dialogue the first and last volumes, (English) are certainly the best things I have written." Cooper also discusses a recent book on Lafayette, stating that there may be some interest in translating the book, and assuring the publishers that it won't interfere with the selling of his own work. Cooper plans to embark on a six-month tour of Europe including visits to the south, then to Berlin and Amsterdam and up into the Arctic Circle; he will write "sketches of what I shall see with American [underscored] eyes." He closes with a statement about the necessity of copyrights for creating a national literature. Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  4. Cruz Bahamonde, Nicolás de la, 1757-1828.
    [Manuscript] [c. 1813] Anecdotas a del viage / Nicolas de la Bahamonde Cruz.
    Cruz's manuscript contains accounts of his travels in South America (Chile and Argentina) and Europe (Spain, France, and Italy). File notes indicate page numbers for his discussion of various places (Buenos Aires 6-8, Spain 9-15, France 16-18 and 30-37, Italy 18-29). He published his account of traveling in Spain France and Italy (1806-1813) and also wrote about conditions in his native Chile Compendio de la historia civil del reyno de Chile (1795) with Juan Ignacio Molina.
  5. Davy, Humphry, Sir, 1778-1829.
    [Letter] 1805 October 29, [London], [to] Dear Sir / H[umphry] Davy.
    Davy regrets that he was not able to meet the recipient in Ireland, and thanks him for "taking the trouble to transmit my letters." Davy states that his journey into the North has furnished him with ample material to research in his winter leisure; he declares himself especially interested in the formation of basaltic rock. Davy thanks the recipient particularly for introducing him to Dr. Richardson whose work he has found useful. One of the first professional scientists, Davy studied many areas of natural history including chemistry, agriculture, and electricity; he was friends with Coleridge and Wordsworth and mentored Michael Faraday, whose letters are represented in the collection. He was president of the Royal Society, won the Copley medal the year this letter was written, founded the London Zoo and the Athenaeum, and developed a safety lamp for miners.
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