"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Cooper, James Fenimore, 1789-1851.
    [Letter] 1850 January 5, Ostego Hall, Cooperstown [to] Miss Jewett, Boston / J[ames]. Fenimore Cooper.
    Cooper complies with Jewett's request [presumably for an autograph] and states that he wishes it were worth her trouble to receive this boon. He also reveals that at Paris he knew a Princess of [Salm-Dyle?] who claimed that she invented autograph albums. Stating that he has offered his signature in many such volumes, Cooper notes that his female correspondents for this purpose have been as numerous "as I dare say, handsome and agreeable-- though I am obliged to take these qualities on credit." Cooper, the 11th of 12 children born to the man who founded Cooperstown and built Ostego Hall, is remembered for his books of sailing and wilderness adventure, including the Leatherstocking Series featuring Natty Bumppo, the most well-known of which is Last of the Mohicans (1826). In addition to enjoying the life of a country gentleman in New York, Cooper also traveled and wrote extensively in Europe.
  2. Coppée, Henry, 1821-1895; Coppée, Edward; Coppée, Eliza; Thurston, J.W.
    [Letter] 1829 December 16, Savannah [to] Alethea Coppée, Boston, Massachusetts / Henry Coppée.
    Coppée writes to his sister to relate the family news of studies and illness and plans for visiting, asking her to convey Christmas messages on his behalf, and stating that he is glad to hear she's happy. On the verso, their father Edward Coppée states that this was Henry's first letter, and urges Alethea to strive to "get understanding." Henry and Alethea's sister Eliza takes up the pen next and expresses how welcome it would be to see her sister again; as far as her own studies go, she has not improved much, and she lists her coursework, and rejoices that their parents have been spared to them as a local girl, Evelina, has been recently orphaned. She also sends greetings from Old Mama who has a sprightly seven-month old baby named Ann. Prior to assuming the duties as the first President of Lehigh from 1866 to 1875, Coppée worked on the railroad, fought in the Army during the Mexican War, and taught at West Point and the University of Pennsylvania. During his term in office, many buildings including the President's house, Packer Hall, and the University Center were constructed; Coppée also delivered lectures on history, logic, rhetoric, political economy and Shakespeare.
  3. Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867.
    [Letter] 18[47?] March 22, Royal Institution [to] Dr. Henry / M[ichael]. Faraday.
    Faraday declares that Henry must not know his rule: "I never dine out & go to [...?] parties very rarely," citing his busy schedule as well as his health as reasons, and stating that he cannot break this rule without giving "just offense" to many kind persons. He expresses regret that he must "lose the pleasure of your company." A philosopher as well as a scientist, Faraday experimented with electricity, chemistry, radiation, and physics. Sir Humphrey Davy, whose influence secured Faraday his first position as a laboratory assistant at the Royal Institution, was his mentor, and his contemporary John Tyndall (whose work, along with Davy's, is also represented in the collection) wrote Faraday's biography in 1872. Faraday became director of the laboratory in the Royal Institution in 1825 where he devised a lecture series, taught chemistry at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, became a fellow of the Royal Society as well as a scientific adviser to the Corporation of Trinity House, and his portrait appears on the Bank of England's twenty-pound note.
  4. Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867; Faraday, Sarah, 1800-1879.
    [Letter] 1856 May 10, Folkstone, [Kent, England] [to] Miss Moone / M[ichael]. Faraday.
    The bulk of the letter is written by Sarah Faraday, with a note appended by her husband Michael Faraday, thanking Miss Moone for her letter and stating that they are "very comfortable." Sarah explains that "it was not a cold but a long continued headache" which prompted Dr. Bence Jones to urge them to go to Folkstone; Sarah avers that "which I knew by experience was the only thing to do my dear husband good." She lauds country living as having "room to move about and pleasant companions [her two nieces]." In June of 1821, Faraday married Sarah Barnard (1800-1879), daughter of the Sandemanian silversmith Edward Barnard (1767-1855); evidence suggests that Sarah assisted Faraday in his duties, and though they had no children, two nieces lived with them in the Royal Institution for extended periods. A philosopher as well as a scientist, Faraday experimented with electricity, chemistry, radiation, and physics. Sir Humphrey Davy, whose influence secured Faraday his first position as a laboratory assistant at the Royal Institution, was his mentor, and his contemporary John Tyndall (whose work, along with Davy's, is also represented in the collection) wrote Faraday's biography in 1872.
  5. Faraday, Michael, 1791-1867; Wordsworth, William, 1770-1850.
    [Letter] 1858 November 7 [to] [George] Wilson / M[ichael]. Faraday.
    Faraday thanks Wilson for sending him a copy of his book, The five gateways to knowledge, promising to "I hold it close at hand for a pleasant reading very shortly." A philosopher as well as a scientist, Faraday experimented with electricity, chemistry, radiation, and physics. Sir Humphrey Davy, whose influence secured Faraday his first position as a laboratory assistant at the Royal Institution, was his mentor, and his contemporary John Tyndall (whose work, along with Davy's, is also represented in the collection) wrote Faraday's biography in 1872. Faraday became director of the laboratory in the Royal Institution in 1825 where he devised a lecture series, taught chemistry at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, became a fellow of the Royal Society as well as a scientific adviser to the Corporation of Trinity House, and his portrait appears on the Bank of England's twenty-pound note.
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