"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. [Handbill] [1865 April 19] Order of the Funeral Procession [of] President Abraham Lincoln.
    The Order of the Procession for Lincoln's funeral lists in detail the attendants, representatives from the military and the Senate, pall bearers, State representatives, and gives instructions for the tolling of the bells, military salutes, and the wearing of the mourning armband on the left arm and hilt of the sword. Grant, Halleck, and Colfax (each represented in the collection) are named on the handbill. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.

  2. [Ticket] [1865 April 19] Admit the bearer to the Executive Mansion [for funeral ceremonies for Abraham Lincoln].
    The ticket entitles the bearer to admittance to the Executive Mansion on the day of Lincoln's funeral. The word "EAST" appears at the top of the recto, perhaps indicating the designated entrance for mourners. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
  3. [Anonymous].
    [Handbill] [1865 April 19] "We Loved Him--Living. / We Revere Him-- Dead." [for] Abraham Lincoln's funeral.
    The handbill features the American flag with the words "The Union and the Constitution" among the stars, and the slogan "We Loved Him--Living./ We Revere Him--Dead" over the stripes. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
  4. [Aunt of Mary Custis Lee].
    [Letter] 1832 August 14 [to] Dearest Niece [Mrs. M.C. Lee] / [Aunt of Mary Custis Lee].
    Lee's "Dear Old Aunt" writes to her on two topics: health and fashion. The Aunt urges Mary Ann to write to her mother, and discusses her health; she tells Mary about a bonnet with a border that's too full, and relates that she has just washed two frocks for her, alluding to two other women who are currently expecting, and at different stages of their confinement. The Aunt discusses cholera and its presence in New York, but not in Boston, and not to a great extent in Washington. She affirms that had she not had to look after Ned, it would be "my duty to go to you as well as my pleasure." She urges Mary Ann to stay healthy, avoid crabs and melons, not to bathe too much, and not to exert herself. She hopes and prays that "the father of all have you & Bob in his especial keeping." In the letter she also mentions her plans to go to Bath and take the waters, as well as her hope that Bob could get a furlough "to be with you." She also mentions Arlington, the estate of Mary Ann's father, George Washington Parke Custis, the grandson of Martha Washington. Mary Ann married Robert E. Lee in 1831 and accompanied him to his station: Old Point Comfort, Virginia where she received this letter. At the time she received this letter, she had probably just given birth or was going to give birth soon to her first son George Washington Custis Lee. She would go on to have seven children, to stand by her husband during his command of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and ultimately to lose her home, Arlington, to the federal government for non-payment of taxes during the war; it became a federal cemetery.
  5. Anderson, Dave.
    [Letter] 1862 June 27, Beverly [to] Friend [Joseph D. Richardson] / Dave Anderson.
    Anderson states that he'd like to "see you old boy," and is glad to hear that Richardson is better. He assures him that he "didn't let your folk see that letter and won't let them know anything about that." He then relates a story about going to town and helping the girls pick out frocks; his clowning almost got them turned out of the store. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
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