"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Acheson, Dean, 1893-1971.
    [Letter] 1952, June 9, Washington (D.C.) [to] Francis E. Walter / Dean Acheson.
    Acheson writes to inform Walter that he has been approved as an Alternate United States Representative to the Third Session Provisional Intergovernmental Committee for the Movement of Migrants from Europe set to convene in Washington, D.C. on June 10, 1952.
  2. Adams, Sherman, 1899-1986.
    [Letter] 1952 January 9, Concord N.H., [to] Honorable Francis E. Walter/ Sherman Adams.
    Adams thanks Walter for the information he gave Norris Cotton on the Displaced Persons program. He reveals that the pulpwood industry has had to import seasonal labor from Canada and is investigating the possibility of providing land for these displaced persons to live on while they work. At the time this letter was written, Adams was serving as Governor of New Hampshire (1949-1953). Before assuming these duties, Adams served as representative to the American Pulpwood Industry in New York (1946-1948). Also a Representative to the 79th Congress, Adams would go on to be Assistant to Eisenhower (1953-1958). Congressman Walter served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963. Walter also acted as chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities.
  3. Chennault, Claire Lee, 1893-1958.
    [Letter] 1949 June 11 [to] Francis E. Walter, Washington, D.C. / C.L. Chennault.
    Chennault encloses a copy of his notes on China due to the importance of the "Communist conquest of China to the welfare of the United States." Chennault prepared these notes from his twelve years of "intimate observation," as a private citizen, impelled by the belief that the "communization of China gravely threatens the peace and security of our own country." A fighter pilot and author of The Role of Defensive Pursuit (1935), Chennault was an advisor to Chiang Kai-Shek from 1937 through World War II, receiving China's highest honor for his service in training the Chinese air force to combat the Japanese; his American Volunteer Group was incorporated into the Army in 1942. Postwar, Chennault organized an airline to assist in the relief efforts in China and to support the Nationalists; he cooperated with the CIA, and his airline was used during the Korean War. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963.
  4. Chiang, Kai-shek, 1887-1975.
    [Letter] 1960 April 19, Taipei, Taiwan [to] Francis E. Walter, Washington, D.C. / Chiang Kai-Shek.
    Kai-Shek thanks Walter for his friendly letter which was forwarded by Ambassador Yeh. Kai-Shek states, "I appreciate very much your kind sentiments, and hope to have the pleasure of hearing from you again." At the time this letter was written, Kai-Shek had established a presidency in exile in Taiwan after communist forces drove him out of power in China where he had been head of the Nationalist government from 1928 to 1949. A few years before this communication was written, the United States signed an agreement to guarantee the defense of Chiang's Nationalist government in Taiwan. The recipient of the letter, Francis E. Walter, served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963. Walter also acted as chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities.
  5. Clark, Tom C. (Tom Campbell), 1899-1977.
    [Letter] December 18, Washington, DC [to] Tad [Francis E. Walter] / Tom Clark.
    Clark extends Christmas greetings to Walter, but states that these are "Serious times." He reminisces about a speaking engagement in Bethlehem with Stu Symington. Clark began his career in Texas as a district attorney; the influence of his mentor Sam Rayburn, who is represented in the collection, secured him an appointment in 1937 in the Bureau of War Risk Litigation. In Washington, Clark handled antitrust, war claims, war fraud, and the relocation of Japanese-Americans during World War II. As Chief of War Frauds unit in 1942 he befriended Harry Truman who appointed him Attorney General in 1945 and Supreme Court justice in 1949 in recompense for developing Truman's anti-Communist program and passing civil rights legislation. Clark dismantled segregation by supporting the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education; he was also an advocate for the House Un-American Activities Committee, voting to sustain its investigative powers in 1961. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963.
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