"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. [Act of Congress] 1963 April 9. House Resolution 4374 for the Honorary Citizenship of Winston Churchill.
    The Act was probably transmitted to Walter along with a letter from the White House regarding the citizenship which is also represented in the collection. Churchill had successfully led the British as prime minister to victory as part of the Allied forces of World War II for which he was honored by 37 orders, decorations, and medals as well as honorary degrees and the Nobel prize for literature in 1953. In addition to military service as a young man in Cuba, India, and Africa, Churchill filled cabinet, civil service, and administrative positions in the Colonial Office, the Home Office, the cabinet, and as Lord of the Admiralty and Member of Parliament; in 1921 he participated in negotiations with Michael Collins over the Irish Free State. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963.
  2. [Dibdin?].
    [Letter] 1869 August 2, Wicklow [to] D. Drumm / [Dibdin?].
    The author regrets that his absence from Dublin caused him to miss Drumm's kind visit. He encloses a recommendation to the authorities of the British Museum [to obtain a reader's card, scholars needed someone to vouch for them]. He also encloses recommendations for March's Library and Trinity College.
  3. [Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963].
    [Letter] 1963 April 10, Washington [to] Francis E. Walter, Georgetown Hospital, Washington, D.C. / [Kennedy].
    Kennedy sends Walter the pen used to sign the House Resolution 4374 making Churchill an honorary citizen. Calling the Act a "direct result" of Walter's involvement, Kennedy regrets that illness kept Walter from attending the ceremony and hopes that he will soon recover his health. At the time this Act was signed, Churchill had successfully led the British as prime minister to victory as part of the Allied forces of World War II for which he was honored by 37 orders, decorations, and medals as well as honorary degrees and the Nobel prize for literature in 1953. In addition to military service as a young man in Cuba, India, and Africa, Churchill filled cabinet, civil service, and administrative positions in the Colonial Office, the Home Office, the cabinet, and as Lord of the Admiralty and Member of Parliament; in 1921 he participated in negotiations with Michael Collins over the Irish Free State. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963, not long after this letter was written.
  4. Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.
    [Letter] 1823 March 2, Washington [D.C.], [to] Benjamin Abbot, Esqr., Exeter N.H. / John Quincy Adams.
    Adams writes to the Exeter school of which Abbot was Principal (1788-1838) regarding the acceptance of his "young relative" Thomas Johnson Hellen. He states that Mr. Plumer will bring Thomas to the school and oversee his bills. Adams is particular about the matter of clothing allowance and specifies amounts for washing and mending expenses. As Adams plans to send Thomas on to Cambridge, he requests aid in ascertaining "his proficiency hitherto, and how long it will yet take to prepare him for the university." At the time this letter was written, Adams was serving as Secretary of State under President Monroe (1817-1825); he was elected the sixth President of the United States and served 1825-1829, after which he served in the House of Representatives (1831-1848). Before assuming these duties, Adams was appointed to diplomatic roles, as minister to the Netherlands, Russia, England, and Prussia; he also served as a Senator (1803-1808).
  5. Adams, John, 1735-1826.
    [Letter] July 5, [1813], Quincy (Mass.) [to] Mathew Carey, Esquire / John Adams.
    Adams explains to Mathew Carey that he is sending papers delivered to him by John Marston and vouches for their authenticity. He requests that a particular letter by Captain Hoisted [Hoystead] Hacker be returned to him and describes John Marston as an ardent supporter of the views of Mathew Carey and Mr. Clark. Adams mentions Captain Simpson and relates that Simpson served as the First Lieutenant of Captain John Paul Jones when he captured a twenty-gun ship (HMS Drake) in 1778. Adams remarks that Captain Simpson's name "ought to be more known in History than it is." Adams asks that Carey question Captain Jonathan Williams if he differs in that sentiment, and states that he will dispute the matter with him. In 1778, Captain John Paul Jones arrested his Lieutenant Thomas Simpson for disobedience shortly after the mentioned capture of the HMS Drake while aboard the Ranger. Jones only dropped the charges after much correspondence with Adams and the other statesmen stationed in France, finally allowing Simpson to take command of the Ranger, while he went on to command the Bonhomme Richard. Jonathon Williams was a commercial and diplomatic agent in France at the time of the Drake's capture and, along with his great uncle, Benjamin Franklin, he was a supporter of John Paul Jones. Thomas Simpson is often characterized as a fiery and mutinous lieutenant, but Adams suggests in his autobiography (1802-1807) that "the arbitrary Conduct of Jones was the cause of great Injustice to him." Adams served as a Member of the Continental Congress, signed the Declaration of Independence, and was the first Vice President of the United States during George Washington's term of office; he was elected President and served from 1797-1801. He is the father of John Quincy Adams, the sixth President of the United States. Mathew Carey, a Philadelphia based publisher, published Thomas Clark's Naval History (1813, 1814) and received frequent suggestions from Adams while expanding this work for its second edition. John Marston, who was a midshipman at the time, would eventually became a rear-admiral and would have a continued relationship with John Adams, being one of the last people to see the former president before his death.
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