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  1. [Handbill] [1865 April 19] Order of the Funeral Procession [of] President Abraham Lincoln.
    The Order of the Procession for Lincoln's funeral lists in detail the attendants, representatives from the military and the Senate, pall bearers, State representatives, and gives instructions for the tolling of the bells, military salutes, and the wearing of the mourning armband on the left arm and hilt of the sword. Grant, Halleck, and Colfax (each represented in the collection) are named on the handbill. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.

  2. [Ticket] [1865 April 19] Admit the bearer to the Executive Mansion [for funeral ceremonies for Abraham Lincoln].
    The ticket entitles the bearer to admittance to the Executive Mansion on the day of Lincoln's funeral. The word "EAST" appears at the top of the recto, perhaps indicating the designated entrance for mourners. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
  3. [Anonymous].
    [Handbill] [1865 April 19] "We Loved Him--Living. / We Revere Him-- Dead." [for] Abraham Lincoln's funeral.
    The handbill features the American flag with the words "The Union and the Constitution" among the stars, and the slogan "We Loved Him--Living./ We Revere Him--Dead" over the stripes. The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
  4. [Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963].
    [Letter] 1963 April 10, Washington [to] Francis E. Walter, Georgetown Hospital, Washington, D.C. / [Kennedy].
    Kennedy sends Walter the pen used to sign the House Resolution 4374 making Churchill an honorary citizen. Calling the Act a "direct result" of Walter's involvement, Kennedy regrets that illness kept Walter from attending the ceremony and hopes that he will soon recover his health. At the time this Act was signed, Churchill had successfully led the British as prime minister to victory as part of the Allied forces of World War II for which he was honored by 37 orders, decorations, and medals as well as honorary degrees and the Nobel prize for literature in 1953. In addition to military service as a young man in Cuba, India, and Africa, Churchill filled cabinet, civil service, and administrative positions in the Colonial Office, the Home Office, the cabinet, and as Lord of the Admiralty and Member of Parliament; in 1921 he participated in negotiations with Michael Collins over the Irish Free State. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963, not long after this letter was written.
  5. Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.
    [Letter] 1823 March 2, Washington [D.C.], [to] Benjamin Abbot, Esqr., Exeter N.H. / John Quincy Adams.
    Adams writes to the Exeter school of which Abbot was Principal (1788-1838) regarding the acceptance of his "young relative" Thomas Johnson Hellen. He states that Mr. Plumer will bring Thomas to the school and oversee his bills. Adams is particular about the matter of clothing allowance and specifies amounts for washing and mending expenses. As Adams plans to send Thomas on to Cambridge, he requests aid in ascertaining "his proficiency hitherto, and how long it will yet take to prepare him for the university." At the time this letter was written, Adams was serving as Secretary of State under President Monroe (1817-1825); he was elected the sixth President of the United States and served 1825-1829, after which he served in the House of Representatives (1831-1848). Before assuming these duties, Adams was appointed to diplomatic roles, as minister to the Netherlands, Russia, England, and Prussia; he also served as a Senator (1803-1808).
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