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11-15 of 19 Items.

  1. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 8, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    Irving reminds Kemble of the letter he had written previously "in a moment of vexation" on the subject of Mr. Johasen [Jeronimus Johasen?] who had promised to aid Irving's brother in obtaining an office, and then set out to obtain it for himself. Irving calls this behavior "trickery," and encloses a letter from a different sort of man, Mr. Benjamin F. Butler, for Van Buren. Irving states that he is sorry to trouble Kemble in the matter but his domestic comfort and the welfare of his family are now too much involved. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  2. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 24, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    In compliance with Kemble's suggestion, Irving has approached the leaders of the party to interest them in his brother's case. Irving characterizes this solicitation as "irksome," and cites only his concern for the welfare of his brother's family as his motivation; they are a numerous group with diminishing means. Irving lists the steps he has taken on his brother's behalf as well as the people he has spoken to including, in a postscript Mr. [Jeronimus Johasen?]. He regrets that he cannot come to Washington until the matter is settled. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  3. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1842 April 5, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    Irving fears that he will not see Kimble before he departs as minister to Spain. He explains that he has been in a turmoil of preparations for this "sudden and unexpected change in my life and pursuits." Irving states that his nephew Pierre will have his power of attorney, and that Kemble should pay him any interest that may accrue from the purchase. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  4. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1833 January 4, Washington [to] Kemble c/o J.K. Paulding, NY / Washington Irving.
    Irving tells Kemble he has already written to Paulding on the subject of his rumored displacement [Paulding had been appointed navy agent for New York by President Monroe in 1824]. Irving received the first notice of it in a "red hot letter" from an unnamed source; he immediately went to the Secretary of the Navy who assured him that he had not heard the rumor. Next, Irving wrote and met with Van Buren who confirmed that the displacement had been suggested, but who spoke warmly of Paulding's character so that Irving characterizes "Old Hickory" as "one of the truest old Caballeros I have ever known." Paulding, who had married Kemble's sister Gertrude in 1818, went on to serve as Secretary of the Navy in Van Buren's cabinet. Irving then refutes the rumors of Bankhead that he is to marry Rebecca, a young belle, and run the New York post office. As an "ancient gentleman" he thought he was safe from such talk. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He collaborated with Paulding on a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  5. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1833 January 25, Washington [to] Kemble, West Point Foundry, Cold Spring, NY / Washington Irving.
    Irving reports that Kemble's plan as forwarded by Verplauch could not overcome the strong Pennsylvanian opposition; Verplauch did, however, make an elegant speech on the topic. Irving also states that he received a letter from Van Buren regarding the matter of Paulding losing his position (see the January 4 letter in the collection), and Irving is assured that Van Buren will not do anything to injure Paulding. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
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